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disruptive children

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by hazel180, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. i spend alot of time in my daughters(who's six) primary school,i am becoming very concerned that she will fall behind,as everytime i am within the school, the teacher is constantly reprimanding the same four or five children.(who are all seven).
    i have mentioned this to the teacher and the headmistress,yet there behaviour remains the same.my daughter is romping away with her reading (stage 10) but lacks confidence in other subjects,could this be through lack of concentration?
     
  2. i spend alot of time in my daughters(who's six) primary school,i am becoming very concerned that she will fall behind,as everytime i am within the school, the teacher is constantly reprimanding the same four or five children.(who are all seven).
    i have mentioned this to the teacher and the headmistress,yet there behaviour remains the same.my daughter is romping away with her reading (stage 10) but lacks confidence in other subjects,could this be through lack of concentration?
     
  3. bigkid

    bigkid New commenter

    Has she fallen behind?
    Fall behind what exactly?
    She is unlikely to fall behind the other children in the class as they are all going to be equally disrupted.
    If her reading is that good I think it is unlikely she will fall behind too far in anything other than Maths.
    Is she doing worse than you think she ought to be doing? In what way?
    What is her Maths like?
    Sadly this situation is unlikely to get any better. I taught my Year 13 class this afternoon and confiscated 2 phones from the usual slacker suspects. I estimate I spent nearly half the lesson chivvying them along rather than working with the other pupils who do not present behaviour problems.
    The issues are the same in nearly every class I have ever taught. All that varies is the severity of the poor behaviour. Most ofthe time at the moment the 4-5 pupils that present the biggest problem don't do anything that bad. It wasn't always so.
    It is also highly unlikely that the teacher or the headteacher are unaware of this issue. I'm not sure what you expected to happen as a result of mentioning it. where classroom behaviour is concerned there are no quick fixes.
    It could be through lack of concentration. It could simply be that she knows she is good at reading but doesn't know in the same way whether or not she is good at other things. this could be for a range of different reasons.
    At this early stage I wouldn't worry too much. Just talk to her about what she learned at the end of each day and say positive things about it. If you make her feel like she is doing really well in her other subjects then she might become more confident.
     

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