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Disciplinary For Out of Work Incident?

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by TheoGriff, Jan 1, 2012.

  1. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Your friend needs to get the contact numbers of his regional union office, so that if necessary he can contact them quickly.
    Police involvement is not an issue here. I assume from what you say that there were witnesses from school, so it is possible that SLT will get to hear of it, and could take a dim view.
    Certainly a school can consider that he has brought the school into disrepute, and in many cases that is a serious matter. They might also consider his use of violence to put children at risk, if he lost his temper at school, for example.
    All schools are bound not by the government but by their own set procedures, which are written up and available for all staff. Trust school or not, it has to have these, and they will have been vetted and agreed to see that they are fair.
    So your friend should also look out a copy of his contract, and also the school's Disciplinary Procedures for staff, so that he knows where he might stand if there is an investigation into his behaviour.
    How stupid.
    Best wishes
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  2. I don't think he is in a Union. At least one member of SLT were there at the time of the incident so they certainly will know about it.
     
  3. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    I would join one as soon as possible if I were him.
    Either way, he only has himself to blame.
     
  4. I know I am older but I have never understood why some of our staff members get drunk on work nights out. I know that everyone works hard and needs to let their hair down but it is so risky to do so in front of work colleagues. It is hard to maintain a professional appearance when everyone has seen you falling over, rambling and vomiting outside a night club!
    By all means have a good time with friends and family but this is a salutory lesson about staying sober at work parties.
    If your friend has been daft enough not to join a union then it will be more challenging to fight a disciplinary. It will all depend upon a lot of factors and it will only become clear when he returns to work.
    I am sure he is feeling really rotten about the whole thing and will I am sure have learned a lesson from the experience.
     
  5. He has had a worrying and stressful Christmas/new year holiday as you can imagine. He's not bothered what happens so long as he doesn't lose his job.
     
  6. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    It is too late to get union support for this incident but they can get advice from an employment solicitor. Although he shouldn't have punched the other person shouldn't have been verbally abusive and pushed first either. Hopefully nothing will come of it and your friend will join a union, not drink so much and do something to learn to control his temper.
     
  7. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Really? Not bothered about the loss of respect from colleagues? Not bothered that all staff and very possibly many parents will have a lesser opinion of him? Not wondering how on earth he can work effectively with someone he has punched while drunk? Seriously?
    I think you ought to tell your friend that he might want to show that he is VERY bothered about has happened and what will happen. Even if he keeps his job, which is by no means certain, life will be tricky and SLT will want to see that this was most definitely a one off and that he is doing everything possible to make amends and demonstrate he is a perfect role model and ambassador for the school.

    But as others have said, he only has himself to blame.
     
  8. I think he is going to go see the HT first thing and explain all, as he would rather it come out that way instead of through someone else.
     
  9. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    If your friend isn't in a Union (which is a pretty daft situation. Everyone should be in a Union), then he should join pronto and BEFORE school contacts him in any way, or he contacts the Head, about this incident.
    Unions will not deal with something that happens before you join, but if the actual disciplinary process starts after he joins, even if the incident was before, then they might support him.
    So JOIN NOW.
    However he should also have a look at his Home Insurance. Often they have an extra tagged on for legal support in an employment issue. So even if he doesn't get Union asupport (which he should try for, as they are experienced in dealing with school issues), he might get some free legal help.
    Best wishes to you both.
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  10. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    Home insurance cover is usually for legal cases and only if you have more than a 51% chance of winning. Hopefully it won't come to that.
     
  11. Dragonlady30

    Dragonlady30 Star commenter

    I think he might be trying to shut the stable door after the horse has bolted. Bad news travels fast and he can bet that someone has already given the Head a blow by blow account (no pun intended!)
    He might have been better employed sending a full account by email the morning after the event.
    As other posters have said, getting tipsy on a staff night out is not a good move. Far too easy to give those intent on bringing folks down amunition.
     
  12. Gardening Leaves

    Gardening Leaves New commenter

    'Fraid Torey's right, Theogriff: the Supreme Court recently confirmed that teachers have no right to legal support for internal disciplinary proceedings, because they have recourse to an external regulator on appeal.
    The case in question is R (on the application of G) v Governors of X School and Y City Council [2011] UKSC 30
     
  13. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    They may not be able to accompany you, but they can advise you so that you understand what's going on and what your rights are and suggest what to say.
    And what not to say!
    They can also write letters on your behalf to the school. Very helpful that.
    Best wishes
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  14. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    They can do all of that, but you'd have to pay. A good reminder of why it helps to be in a union.
     
  15. rosievoice

    rosievoice Star commenter

    Twenty-odd years of paying my subs to a teaching union, and they proved less than useless when called into performing any kind of legal support. Alas.
     

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