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Digital art in schools

Discussion in 'Art and design' started by brixtonmouse, Jun 15, 2007.

  1. Sorry it's a bit of a long post but I would really like to know other people's views on Digital Art in school.
    I'm just completing my PGCE to teach art and design, and not sure now whether or not I should have done Graphics or ICT. I come from a really 'new' background, where my work is considered 'art' in many circles other than by other art teachers. Would be really interesting to see or hear from anyone else is having similar problems about their backgrounds.

    I have had the oppurtunity to run successful Digital Art projects throught KS3-5 but despite the excitement of doing something new, I've found that it isn't being considered art at all but ICT.

    I trained and worked as a Digital Artist, using and creating my own programs to create my 'art'. I have just spent the past 6 months training other teachers how to use Photoshop and Flash and talked endlessly about technical bits and pieces.
    I have been trying to fight the battle that a Digital medium is still art but being frowned upon by fine artists (painters mainly) that it's just ICT with pictures. Is there anyone else having the same problems?
    The response I have had from the pupils has been varied, some finding it interesting and great that they're not using the computers to play games on, where as others have called it 'fake art' or media studies (?)
    Can it not still be considered a fine art skill even though the outcomes are not created with a pencil/pen or paint?
     
  2. Sorry it's a bit of a long post but I would really like to know other people's views on Digital Art in school.
    I'm just completing my PGCE to teach art and design, and not sure now whether or not I should have done Graphics or ICT. I come from a really 'new' background, where my work is considered 'art' in many circles other than by other art teachers. Would be really interesting to see or hear from anyone else is having similar problems about their backgrounds.

    I have had the oppurtunity to run successful Digital Art projects throught KS3-5 but despite the excitement of doing something new, I've found that it isn't being considered art at all but ICT.

    I trained and worked as a Digital Artist, using and creating my own programs to create my 'art'. I have just spent the past 6 months training other teachers how to use Photoshop and Flash and talked endlessly about technical bits and pieces.
    I have been trying to fight the battle that a Digital medium is still art but being frowned upon by fine artists (painters mainly) that it's just ICT with pictures. Is there anyone else having the same problems?
    The response I have had from the pupils has been varied, some finding it interesting and great that they're not using the computers to play games on, where as others have called it 'fake art' or media studies (?)
    Can it not still be considered a fine art skill even though the outcomes are not created with a pencil/pen or paint?
     
  3. I had the same issues, they classed it more as ICT, strange considering there is a push for more integration of ICT within art, yet i found a digital art SOW was viewed as not art at all.

    I also found grafitti art was a no no, even though it is a legitimate art form. Many schools are naive and old thinking.
     
  4. The subject is art and DESIGN. You don't have to think of it as fine art -- why not view it as illustration? perhaps then it will count.
    I know what you mean though. I teach GCSE Graphics (All outcomes are finally achieved on computer) and find there is a real down on its value by some. It's not just "grabbing an image from google, applying a filter and adding text..." as a GCSE moderator described it to me last year (And even if it was how many adults in your school can do that competently?)....
     
  5. Hi,I have had the complete oposite response from my peers. I am an NQT (career changer, did many years working as a digital artist in the advertising/post production industries) and have introduced schemes of work that HAVE to be worked using computers, all with positive outcomes and feedback. The only problem i faced was the lack of good facilities and juggling between ICT rooms and swapping with 'pre-booked' staff from other subjects. What i really detest is when the students tell me they already do graphics!...in ICT oR D&T; I wish these teachers would explain it correctly, as far as i can tell ...THATS PRODUCT DESIGN!!
     
  6. Darkness, the 'naivety' of schools in not being happy to promote gaffitti art is probably more to do with ongoing problems they , and often their local communities have with the dire end of this 'art form'. It's quite a heavy responsibilty to introduce it as a legitimate art form and not be seen to be glamourising vandalism, and that includes by the kids.

    Although I'm happy for KS4/5 students to look at the work of, for example banksy, in the context of subversive/political art, or to utilise their decorative spray-painting skills in a piece of painting, I would draw the line at just doing a project on 'Graffitti Art'. Can of Worms.
     
  7. Sorry to go off topic.

    To the OP, I think you've just been unlucky in your schools. I'd love to have the facilities and know-how to explore Digital Art. I do have reservations if as a whole course, it eliminates the need for the fundamental skills of looking and seeing that are acquired through drawing.
     
  8. I was lucky enough to have the facilities and the support at the start of the projects, it's when it came to marking that there were problems as my SBT, also the Head of Art, said to me she didn't know how to mark it.
    lozmar - one of the projects for the year 10s was for them to design and model a building using a 3D software package, the DT teacher said they could use that work for their DT coursework. I didnt mind this if it meant the boys had less work to do and more time to do it in, but they also started to see it as a DT lesson and not Art.
    Darkness - Grafitti art is a bit tricky but i guess it depends on the type of school you are in. My sixth form placement were obsessed with Banksy and didnt even consider looking at other such artists. Would love to do a non-stencilling based Grafitti project but only if i'm in a school that is the complete opposite to where i was.
    joli - all my projects that i've done with the pupils as well as my own have always started with the basidcs, the Cd project they looked at composition, they drew their ideas and designs down way before they were allowed to use the computers, the 3D modelling project was started by reasearching and designing buildings, it included loads observational drawing before they even got on to the coputers, the animation project was started with the pupils creating their own characters and from their animations they made comic books, so all projects have included an element of basic skills before the techincal bit was aproached. My year 12 class have just completed an animation project where they started from life drawing, to creating beutifully painted scenery and puppets, to working in Flash. I feel you still need to learn the basics or revise them before you can even think about jumping onto the Digital medium
     
  9. I'm excited about the investment in technology in my school but intend to steer clear of calling an art and design subject outright' digital art' like you would 'painting' it seems a very woolly term (there are no art and design endorsements with this 'digital art' title so anyone with this as a specialism will encounter problems)which i feel creates the issues mentioned on here amongst school staff as to what it actually is. it implies to me an absence of tradition being required within the breadth of art which is nonsense at school level especially, i see digital as another tool available to us across the art and design curriculum rather than stipulating it as a specialism, i'd prefer to attach digital when talking about say magazine layout within digital graphics practice

    my experience of working with those trained in digital art without traditional skills is that it has in some involved a very different working process which has had problems transferring at school level to curriculi - primary sources, sketchbook work, creative understanding of aesthetics and visual language and been more about techniques in programming for example. I would welcome others experiences and thoughts on this, it would be great to get kids programming in flash to do really interactive stuff in year 13 maybe but need to still teach them core traditional too

    I thoroughly welcome teachers with particular digital skills,CS3, Final Cut, VJ'ing etc, contemporary practice is full of work exploring the digital especially through cross-arts projects and teachers need these skills BUT we must do this in relationship to core skills too; how does drawing translate digitally, model set based animation filmed and put into stop frame software etc etc.

    does anyone have any thoughts about art and design graphics curriculum and what is being offered in DIDA?




     
  10. An interesting point. I have found many actually use traditional art forms and then use the computer to add on and enhance.
     
  11. Its a shame this post seems to have died? I'd be really interested to hear other's view- as digital technology gets more affordable i think its a prime time to think about where digital sits in the art and design curriculum?
     
  12. I think there are certain mediums which lend themselves better but you are right,digital art is now becoming a growing thing and a necesseity in the art and design world. Personally i would like sone graphic tablets, for GCSE etc.

    I know many struggle with it and simply use it as an add on, for research etc or basic photoshop stuff.
     
  13. I've just started teaching Graphics and also Art with Photography to AS pupils. I am hoping to integrate all areas into KS3 and 4 schemes of work. It is hard though to fit it all in. Teaching the fundamentals of art and design is a huge process and doesn't leave much time to do anything else. The other problem is lack of facilities and equipment. I too have to try to bribe another teacher who has prebooked all of the ICT rooms into letting me have one for the odd lesson. As a part-timer, I find this incredibly annoying and quite often don't manage to book anything for weeks.
     
  14. Yes in deed this is a matter of great debate for me as a digital immigrant I have found it difficult learning and keeping up with flash and photo shop. Some Graphics artists think that specialising so early will take their jobs..well yes.. but then it is your responsibility to move with the times. There has and still is a blind faith in technology bringing improvement. Taking postman's 10 principals it might be worth analysing how new technology changes things. I agree that for we should be preparing our students for jobs and giving them the most up to date skills we can as we compete on a world stage digital skills are essential. Art teaching will change for sure as will our perception of it in time. However people will always be connected to the tangible authentic art making. Computers take the mess out of art but perhaps alerting the students to the differences might make them appreciate the authentic mediums more.
     

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