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Difference between DHT & HT

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by Flyguy, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. I am currently a DHT but aspiring to be a HT at some point in the future. During a professional development conversation my head asked me why I wanted to be a HT. I gave my answer which I thought clearly explained my ambition to lead a school so that it becomes integral to the community and that all children achieve etc etc.
    However, the head said to me that my answer showed I wasn't clear on the difference between DHT and HT. She wouldn't tell me what sort of answer she was looking for but said I will know I am ready for headship when I know this.
    Anybody fancy helping me out on your views of the difference between headship and deputy?
     
  2. I am currently a DHT but aspiring to be a HT at some point in the future. During a professional development conversation my head asked me why I wanted to be a HT. I gave my answer which I thought clearly explained my ambition to lead a school so that it becomes integral to the community and that all children achieve etc etc.
    However, the head said to me that my answer showed I wasn't clear on the difference between DHT and HT. She wouldn't tell me what sort of answer she was looking for but said I will know I am ready for headship when I know this.
    Anybody fancy helping me out on your views of the difference between headship and deputy?
     
  3. How long have you been a deputy? Secondary or Primary?
    Some heads are on a big ego trip and all this 'you're not ready for it' stuff is boll*cks. There are lots of ways of being a successful head imo.
     
  4. This is my third year as a deputy. I am not looking for a headship yet but knowthat will be my move one day. Have just racked my brains thinking what else I could have said to show how much I want headship. As a deputy, you have to stand in for the head in their absence so there are similarities between the jobs!
     
  5. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    The best way to know you are ready, or know which areas you need to develop is to imagine the head has been knocked down by a bus ( some people enjoy this thought) and you get the ofsted call.
    What would you panic about the most. They're the areas you need to work on. Simples!

    I thoroughly enjoyed being a deputy and I love being a head. I was lucky enough in my 2nd dht post ( I wanted to broaden my experience in a very different school) to work with a head who let me do all the stuff which I was still very wobbly about (hr stuff, legal - competence procedures and she let me set the budget for 2 years because I found that scary!)

    I love being a head, no two days are the same. Everyone expects you to know everything. By 9 am I have usually had about 5 impromptu meetings. The day never goes as planned ( more than when you're dht.) everyone expects to be able to see you right now and have an instant answer to their problems. No matter how crappy your day is you have to smile and be cheerful, and of course the buck stops with you. Never underestimate how scary it is to see your name on an ofsted report- no matter how good! You are responsible ( in the eyes of parents LA staff ofsted and community) for everything which happens in school. That's a huge pressure. I do miss having a class but I still teach and have a lot of regular contact with the kids, but that takes effort and determination.
     

  6. <font size="2">DHTs generally have strengths in curriculum, teaching and learning, developing relationships, assessment, often SEN, curriculum leadership and supporting and developing staff. They are probably able to timetable (hall, playground etc.) and are good leading training/meetings and sometimes behaviour management. </font>

    I also think, as a DHT, I lacked a broader perspective- really understanding where different stakeholders were coming from on issues (Government, LA, Governors, Parents) and adapting my information to their needs and values. In addition, I had to develop a more strategic, long term overview and regularly put things into perspective and learn to pre-empt difficulties and consider the responses to my actions and decisions from various people. Know that it's often very lonely at the top and you need to create support networks as much as you can.Ask your Headteacher, how he/she plans to support you in developing your understanding of the HT role as part of your performance management. Request some time to go and shadow a head in another school too.
     
  7. And you only fully realise that when your Head is off for a significant period and you have to pick up on all that Mrs C lists.
     
  8. You find out, when you've got your own school if you can deal with the pressure and realise that you were not quite as good as you thought you were. This excellent self evaluation will ensure your ego stays in your own pocket, you keep learning, listen to others and realise that mistakes are part of the job, your's and others... You will then employ a deputy who is better than you, which is a good thing, because you can trust them and they will ensure your workload is manageable.
     

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