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Did you know uppity is a racist word?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Corvuscorax, Nov 25, 2019.

  1. Dodros

    Dodros Star commenter

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Busy goblins.:)
     
  2. border_walker

    border_walker Lead commenter

    Agreed
     
    install likes this.
  3. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Star commenter

    My point exactly. The word "goblin" has a very racist origin.

    It comes from the medieval belief that Jews were shrunk when Jesus rose from the dead.

    But it is a word in general use, and no longer associated with its racist origin

    The word "uppity" did not originate in a racist context, it originated with the word "up"

    It might have been used in a racist context at one place, at one point in time, but it has a far more general usage,

    It is a word I will most likely avoid now, as I would rather stay away form "borderline" offensive words, because I do belief "borderline" can be stretched and abused.

    However, I do not belief Holmes was being racist, or that the use of the word in general is racist, although this furorare might make it so!

    Incidentally, the word "pixie" comes from the same myth, told in a different language
     
    Kandahar and border_walker like this.
  4. T34

    T34 Established commenter

    OK. I think I would use "underestimating" in those circumstances.
    The reason being that for me the word "uppity" always implies the acceptance of a class system. So it is about an individual thinking themselves better than you because they think they belong to a higher class than you. They don't just think they are in the same class as you but marginally better than you - they think there is a quantum leap involved, a wide gulf.
     
    Corvuscorax likes this.
  5. Kandahar

    Kandahar Lead commenter

    Thank you for your kind words Mr Weald.
     
  6. Aquamarina1234

    Aquamarina1234 Star commenter

    Try "Rumpelstiltskin".
     
  7. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    Ditto, according to mother I was uppity if I was being difficult, challenging, dismissive or grumpy with a bit of (then) teenage angst.
     
  8. Aquamarina1234

    Aquamarina1234 Star commenter

    Me too.
    Should i have added a hashtag?
     
  9. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    Ha... prob not... :D
     
  10. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    Me too. I don't think it has to have any connotations of class, never mind race. Of course there are some people who make a career out of being offended.
     
  11. sadscientist

    sadscientist Senior commenter

    Me too (sorry, no hashtag) - a term used to children who were seen to be being disrespectful of their “elders and betters”.

    It has also been used (eg as above in the USA) by people who extend the idea of “betters” to those who happen to have been born with pale skin or wealthy parents. Do those conditions automatically demand more respect than we should all give our fellow humans?
     
  12. monicabilongame

    monicabilongame Star commenter

    #me too
     
  13. Aquamarina1234

    Aquamarina1234 Star commenter

    I don't feel bound by the conditions of people I have nothing to do with.
     
    Kandahar and Oscillatingass like this.
  14. delmamerchant

    delmamerchant Established commenter

    The point is, why did he feel that he needed to refer to her in this way? Like it or not, the press attention that she has received has been colour biased and petty. In a way that they would not be for a white comparator. So put in context of the way she has been treated -yes, you can make a racial connection.

    It was used in connection to slaves who were perceived as acting beyond their station in life.

    What needs to happen, is that some need to stop seeing her colour when reporting - this is what we should be discussing, not whether or not you agree re what it means or has connotations with. Think about it..when was the last time you heard the word?
     
  15. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    Indeed I got a the impression mother thought I was being difficult or perhaps rude and not that she thought I was her subordinate... Or even visa versa, we generally had a mutual respect for each other.
     
    Kandahar likes this.
  16. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Star commenter

    its a common every day word, no racial connotations
     
  17. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Star commenter

    nobody can "see" her colour,
     
    Kandahar likes this.
  18. Corvuscorax

    Corvuscorax Star commenter

    I really don't know why you think she is being treated ny worse than anyone else who has married into the royal family. Significantly better than most, I would say. And as to press there really isn't that much. Most press and most people just ignore her, she is not of any particular significnce
     
    border_walker likes this.
  19. sadscientist

    sadscientist Senior commenter

    I, personally, have no problem with people using the word “uppity”. It’s just a word.
    I’ve just tried to explain why, in some contexts, as far as I understand it, it’s use could be considered offensive by some people. Sorry if that’s too difficult.
    I’m out.
     
    border_walker likes this.
  20. simplyme2

    simplyme2 New commenter

    There are a few uppity people on here who think they are above everyone else, have no compassion for people who have had misfortune, are ignorant to basic human law and rights, think they are God or a supreme court judge and revel in people's struggles. One or two are absolutely rude and obnoxious towards some posters who they don't know too. The mind boggles why these affluent people are like they are. Unbelievable. I would certainly think twice before employing them. Also, it seems to me to be a rather cliquey profession nowadays the teaching profession in the UK. You have to mind exactly what you say or it will be taken the wrong way. So uppity is the right word for some people on here I am afraid
     

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