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Did studying the Classics enrich your life?

Discussion in 'Classics' started by Spanakopita, Apr 8, 2013.

  1. No, and in view of your comment I don't think I shall bother.
    Have you read any of those huge tomes by Colleen McCullough? If so, we'll soon be filling up this thread with our forbearance.
     
  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I don't know what kind of a hole the hobbit lived in but the foramen does sound a bit too engineered so I'd opt for the fossa.
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Hoper me genoito! But I did have a soft spot for Mary Renault who caused me fall in love with Alcibiades when I was a teenager.
     
  4. "Did studying the Classics enrich your life?" Yes, it did, and still does - so much so that I start an Open University BA in Classical Studies in October.
     
  5. I'm not too fussed about the use of foramen in a case like this, though to judge by some reviews it incenses some people. Presumably the hole (which had a circular entrance) could just as well be said to have been bored, rather than being a mere dug-out.
    But, never before having used a translation program, I was quite impressed with the result from Google Translate — though it was not, admittedly, a very severe test.
     
  6. You'll have to help me! I can still decline kakos and conjugate a few bits of luo, but there's not much else left.
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Which may it not happen. ie May god forbid!
     
  8. andromache

    andromache New commenter

    sorry everyone, been through a little gloomy patch lately so haven't been tessing at all. hector and both astyanaces are well.
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Hope you aren't still in the gloomy patch, andromache.
     
  10. andromache

    andromache New commenter

    thank you nutella, things are beginning to look less gloomy, fingers crossed that it continues.
     
  11. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I hope so. Have you consulted the oracle?
     
  12. andromache

    andromache New commenter

    now there's a plan!
     
  13. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

  14. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I learned Greek from age 12 at my streamed comprehensive, which offered as a second language either Spanish or Greek. I adored it so much that I taught myself Latin in the sixth form in order to go to university to do classics.

    In my first year, however, being in a class of two people and being made to translate endless chunks of various classics was not what I had in mind, so I switched to ancient history and archaeology which - though I still had to do some reading in Latin and Greek - was much more what I wanted.

    Did it enhance my life? Absolutely. I have since kind of wished I'd read English instead, however!
     
  15. I used to run a website with the motto 'ne pereat lingua latina'.
    'Many stood to cheer, but none to act.' Sad, really.
     
  16. I too was fortunate to attend a grammar school in the 80s where Latin was compulsory - I did O Level and a year of Greek in the Upper IVth (!) but ultimately opted - wrongly - for MFL. I have an English degree from an extremely traditional university where a certain fluency in Latin, and even greater familiarity with the classics in translation, while not being any formal part of the qualifications for the course, was in reality assumed and required;
    My teenage offspring, year 9 at a rural comp, does Latin club for fun, with a wonderful MFL teacher. Already she is asking whether it is realistic to consider doing Classics or classical civilisation at university, I am delighted.
     
  17. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I feel sure that it won't die out. And you are doing your bit with the U3A, though perhaps that's not the better end of the age range to ensure that it carries on. I've just ordered Aurae inter salices from Amazon btw.
     
  18. Yes, I've just agreed to carry on the U3A group for another year, but the youngest current member will be 70 tomorrow!
    That's noble of you, Nutella. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I did in translating it. The best I can do in return is to admit to enjoying a sample of your eponymous spread at breakfast one day in Luxembourg last week!
     
  19. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    It's curiosity rather than nobility. And I love the original. It will do me good to read some Latin too. I am ashamed at how much I have forgotten.
     
  20. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I have just found a nearly new copy of Richmond Lattimore's translation of the Iliad in a charity shop for £1 and I'm off to bed to read some of it. It's supposed to be the best translation ever made.
    And if we get just 75 more views of this thread it will get a gold star!
     

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