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Dictionary use

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by mossop, Sep 7, 2012.

  1. spsmith45

    spsmith45 New commenter

    Actually, no. Most people have effective mastery of their mother tongue without being able to explain how its grammar works.
     
  2. Vladimir

    Vladimir Senior commenter

    The learning of one's native language is the exception, especially when we are talking about language learning. I have pointed that out before too. Beyond the high-exposure language learning that very young children seem to respond so well to, the game is very different and practice should reflect that. Moreover, there are various levels of mastery of one's mother tongue. Some people use it far more eloquently than others. Would you regard someone who uses 'innit?' as an immutable question tag as someone who has mastered his native language? It may be communicative mastery but it won't cut it in an interview for many jobs! I'm surprised you take such a non-academic stance in all this, given your obvious pedigree as a teacher and your maturity. Frankly, you ought to know better!
     
  3. spsmith45

    spsmith45 New commenter

    No doubting your mastery of condescension, vlad. Who are you?
     
  4. Vladimir

    Vladimir Senior commenter

    Feel free to post your reply whenever you are ready, toadman. The thread will still be here.
     
  5. gregcolin

    gregcolin New commenter

    He or she is in France I believe. Another pathetic attempt to try to gain an advantage- typical of the confused person you are!
     
  6. Vladimir

    Vladimir Senior commenter

    Oh I see. The irony of what you write is amazing, considering that I regard your friend's post in exactly the same light - a pathetic attempt to gain an upper-hand. But we can await his return, and also his explanation.
     
  7. gsglover

    gsglover Occasional commenter

    I have no idea what this is about? Cannot face reading the whole thread to discover it either
     
  8. gsglover

    gsglover Occasional commenter

    BTW this thread was intended to be a mildly amusing stroll through dictionary-howler land.
     
  9. Vladimir

    Vladimir Senior commenter

    Post 182. Who said that people who advocate translation were against the use of dictionaries? I certainly didn't and I advocate translation! To me a dictionary is a vital tool and would encourage a language learner to use it as much as possible! You can get so much just from looking through a good dictionary: vocabulary (obviously), but also phrases, idioms, translations of thousands of sentences to and from the TL. I love my dictionaries and will never stop using them! To suggest that I would stop a learner from availing himself of the wealth of learning a dictionary can afford is absurd!
     
  10. gsglover

    gsglover Occasional commenter

    Perhaps it was a reference to the fact that those who didn't see the intended fun of this thread had missed the point, but I must admit that it is a strange post.
     
  11. Vladimir

    Vladimir Senior commenter

    Had I posted something similar, I would doubtless have been called out on it! Sauce for the goose and all that!
     
  12. gsglover

    gsglover Occasional commenter

    Not sure what this means- I was actually sort of agreeing with you!
     
  13. faceman

    faceman New commenter

    I always get "j'ai l'habitude de manger" when a pupil wants to use the imperfect tense.
     
  14. toadman

    toadman Occasional commenter

    Sorry to have caused a bit of trouble. My mistake- I withdraw the post I made. couldn't get back earlier due to being so busy
     
  15. gregcolin

    gregcolin New commenter

    Fair enough!
     
  16. vacherin

    vacherin New commenter

    Just been marking some speaking GCSE tests and found another e.g. of a student looking up a word which was then mispronounced so I didn't get it at first. It sounded like crevatté de faire..- it must have been essayé de faire but in looking up try, found tie and made cravate into an er verb?
     
  17. gsglover

    gsglover Occasional commenter

    Nothing surprises me these days but this is a pretty poor attempt in English to spell an easy word!
     
  18. vacherin

    vacherin New commenter

    As you say, nothing is surprising any more!
     
  19. To mix up tie and try strikes me as an example of either carelessness or just not being very bothered.
     
  20. gsglover

    gsglover Occasional commenter

    Exactly!
     

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