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Developmental problems or spoiled brat?

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by maggieDD, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. maggieDD

    maggieDD New commenter

    I work as a one to one LSA with a year 2 BESD statemented child. His mother has a history of mental illness and she had post natal
    depression for two years after his birth. He has no contact or
    awareness of his father.
    He has an extremely low frustration threashold and will have meltdowns when he is asked to do something he doesn't want to do (usually writing based tasks) These meltdowns display themselves by growling, shouting, running out of class, tipping over chairs, throwing pencils and occasionally hitting/kicking/spitting/biting myself or other staff.
    A behaviour support woman came in to observe him today and she asked if he had been diagnosed with anything, which he hasn't. She told me she felt that he was simply spoiled, that his mother has given in to him so often that that is what he now expects, and classroom rules and regulations are a problem for someone who expects everything they're own way.
    Whilst I think that an element of this may be true, I also think that he hasn't developed his coping skills as well as most children of his age and it is my job to try and teach those skills to him. Unfortunately his mother is reluctant to accept the help the same department are offering, although she has to deal with his meltdowns at home too.
    Is it a common 'diagnosis' for someone from a specialist department to simply say that a child with BESD is just a spoiled brat?
     
  2. maggieDD

    maggieDD New commenter

    I work as a one to one LSA with a year 2 BESD statemented child. His mother has a history of mental illness and she had post natal
    depression for two years after his birth. He has no contact or
    awareness of his father.
    He has an extremely low frustration threashold and will have meltdowns when he is asked to do something he doesn't want to do (usually writing based tasks) These meltdowns display themselves by growling, shouting, running out of class, tipping over chairs, throwing pencils and occasionally hitting/kicking/spitting/biting myself or other staff.
    A behaviour support woman came in to observe him today and she asked if he had been diagnosed with anything, which he hasn't. She told me she felt that he was simply spoiled, that his mother has given in to him so often that that is what he now expects, and classroom rules and regulations are a problem for someone who expects everything they're own way.
    Whilst I think that an element of this may be true, I also think that he hasn't developed his coping skills as well as most children of his age and it is my job to try and teach those skills to him. Unfortunately his mother is reluctant to accept the help the same department are offering, although she has to deal with his meltdowns at home too.
    Is it a common 'diagnosis' for someone from a specialist department to simply say that a child with BESD is just a spoiled brat?
     
  3. It is unfortunately common for someone to come in, observe for a short period of time, then make a quick judgement without having to work with the pupil for a longer period of time/get to know them.
    I have to say that with the family history, I would also be looking at possible attachment issues/attachment disorder. It would be worth you having a look at. Firm boundaries and clear consequences are also appropriate, but the psychology of it all if there are atttachment issues is quite complex/merits some reading - many of the behaviours sound similar, many of the strategies are useful generally.
     
  4. maggieDD

    maggieDD New commenter




    Thanks
    all.

    I have read a lot about attachment disorders, am currently studying towards a psychology degree with the OU.
    It is an extremely complex disorder and the books I have read (including 'Inside I'm Hurting, and Attachment in the Classroom') go a long way into explaining WHY children with attachment problems behave as they do, but not HOW to deal with them to make changes in their behaviour. I understand it is vital to understand the reasons children behave they way they do, but I have yet to find any successful strategies that work with this child.
    Also, as a 'professional' hasn't suggested attachment disorders (even though with his background and displayed behaviour it seems pretty likely) the class teachers don't believe that's what his problem is.
    I feel that with all the reading and research I am doing in order to go some way into helping this child, the majority of the staff just think he's a manipulating brat who should go to a residential special school (this has been advised and will happen after the end of this half term, should he continue to use violence during his outbursts)

     

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