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Developing writing in yr R especially boys

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by kaz_allan, May 4, 2011.

  1. Hi

    Our recent ofsted said we needed to improve writing in Year R - we have introuduced a greater range of resources in our writing area and are targeting boys with their models and suggesting ideas to encourage writing about them or labelling.
    I love the way ofsted say this but dont actually tell you what they expect to see. Has anyone had a similar experience and can anyone help with ideas/suggestions of how they develop writing well in their reception class?

    thank you
     
  2. Hi

    Our recent ofsted said we needed to improve writing in Year R - we have introuduced a greater range of resources in our writing area and are targeting boys with their models and suggesting ideas to encourage writing about them or labelling.
    I love the way ofsted say this but dont actually tell you what they expect to see. Has anyone had a similar experience and can anyone help with ideas/suggestions of how they develop writing well in their reception class?

    thank you
     
  3. Love the BOY thing, but it needs handling so carefully. Clipboards - plan or draw your model. When they make one and want to 'save' it I , initially have a label that says "Please leave my model" , then I get them to write a label expressing the same sentiment .. so they either do a hand shape with a cross through it to indicate "Don't touch!" and eventually this develops into the label Please don't touch ... which often is spelt "pleez dont tch" or similar.

    Another way is through captions ... start the caption with "I made a ................ today" and then they draw it.

    That's the models area , but there are opportunities in many play-based situations. Boys LOVE drawing and making maps and can oftren annotate if encouraged to without being 'taken over'. If they think they are being directed they will often back off. If they are left to explore they are happy to take risks with their learning.

    I also have lots of booklets made with computer/scrap paper available. They can do whatever they like with them. Often the boys will flick through the pages and scribble on each page (and the girls too if uninspired) BUT as time goes by (and with modelling and experience) they start to make non-fiction books.

    I find Book Week to be the best motivator where everybody becomes an author; it's a wonderful experience when all my children think they are super special and read their book to an 'audience'.

    BTW - your Writing Area sounds great (I have one too) but writing is able to be encouraged everywhere ta anytime. I have lots of paper and coloured pencils in the outdoors at all times. Chalks on the ground/walls too. A large sheet of paper on the ground/wall gets them motivated too.
     
  4. Over to you put in paragraphs in the previous comment!!
     
  5. Yes all of the above are great ideas but boys, and girls but more so boys, need to talk before they can write and they really do need to have something they are interested in before they will even want to write. Have a look at this book from Andrell Education
    [​IMG]

    And also look at abcdoes http://www.abcdoes.typepad.com/ he has some great ideas on his blog to get boys writing.
    Pat
     
  6. Brilliant thanks to you all great advice!!!
     
  7. I disagree with all this 'lets make children interested in writing' or 'boys like non-fiction'. We spend for much time worrying about 'creativity' and too little about structure. We should teach very simple and boring sentence work giving children something to build on. None of you are creative writers in any meaningful sense so why do we expect children to be. We should teach basic literacy skills and not inflict some skewered middle class 'we can all become JK Rowlings' just given the chance.
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Alistair (abcdoes) was involved in the production and delivery of the Talk the Big Talk training (amazing day) so good advice.
    It works on the premise that if a child (girls and boys) can't say a sentence they aren't going to be able to write one. Give them something to say and they will have something to write.
    Personally I would argue good teaching is good for boys (and girls) and we do boys a disservice by expecting less of them because they are boys.
     

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