1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Developing Support Staff

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by Abbie_Deeming, Jun 17, 2016.

  1. I working in Higher Education and my key focus is developing and delivering courses aimed at Teaching Assistants and other non-QTS staff. I was wondering what Head Teachers think of the new Teaching Assistant standards - http://maximisingtas.co.uk/ta-standards.php - and what impact these might have?
     
  2. minnie me

    minnie me Star commenter

    I am not a Head but have worked extensively with Teaching Assistants as a line manager and also delivered training courses ( on AFL for example) to TAs as part of a wider Local Authority role. I admit to only having scanned the document but I think the tone of the standards make absolute sense. We ran a Faculty approach to our Curriculum Support model and it worked very well in that expectations and aspiration were high, training needs prioritised, deployment rationale made clear and transparent, performance management targets in situ and strengths played to..... Our TAs were privy to a coaching iniative , observations and feedback and given reponsibility for individuals , co horts of students and the production of an Inclusion newsletter ..... I could go on...Responsibilities were varied and the management of the team quite complex and on occasions demanding when ' nettles needed to be grasped' Investing in them was an 'enabler ' and I was supremely confident that the performances of the TAs impacted positively on the social, academic , personal growth of all of the students in their charge. I suspect that many schools do not prioritise the roles of their additional adults and that as a result systems/ processes / leadership and management are found significantly wanting.Hopefully the standards ( really not rocket science ) go some way to establishing a blue print for good practice and a common professional dialogue about what contributes to students being in receipt of outstanding care, support and guidance.
     

Share This Page