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Developing and enhancing child initiated play

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by kaz_allan, Jul 20, 2011.

  1. We are starting for the first time to drop our topic plans and follow planning from the Childs interests. I am looking forward to this but worried that I won't be able to take their learning on to cover all the areas of the curriculum. Eg we have boys that love trains , construction, guns, and cars and Ben 10 and star wars etc and girls that like role playing homes and schools and like barbie and coloring, I can think of a few ways to extend some of these but really don't no how to make a the curriculum meet their individual interests. Can anyone share examples or ways they have extended these types of interests.

    Thank you so much
     
  2. We are starting for the first time to drop our topic plans and follow planning from the Childs interests. I am looking forward to this but worried that I won't be able to take their learning on to cover all the areas of the curriculum. Eg we have boys that love trains , construction, guns, and cars and Ben 10 and star wars etc and girls that like role playing homes and schools and like barbie and coloring, I can think of a few ways to extend some of these but really don't no how to make a the curriculum meet their individual interests. Can anyone share examples or ways they have extended these types of interests.

    Thank you so much
     
  3. Hello I'm an advanced skills teacher based in Somerset this is the sort of thing I can help with - where are you based? If you are not in Somerset then I'd advise contacting your local early years advisors or ASTs to see if there are any schools in your area who are using a creative curriculum approach whom you can go and visit to have a chat with - if you are in Somerset give me a inbox message and I can take you about creative planning to take account of all childrens interests :)
     
  4. Hi we are miles away fromyou unfortunately. we do the creative curriculum and ave received outstanding for our curriculum recently however it is not really child led, we get their ideas but we already have an end result that the children are directed to with their ideas. We are thinking ditching the curriculum and just truly following childrens interests. It is scary andi worry that nothing will be covered by endofyear.
     
  5. clawdeer

    clawdeer New commenter

    This is what i think, which may be what you used to do anyway, but... things will get covered, but i think you have to orchestrate it that way, otherwise they probably will show most interest in tv characters etc. Your old way can still follow their interests,i think you can still plan a topic overview, maybe not worry about the end results but you still need to know what you want to cover, and how you cover it is what can change / be thought of daily.
    we still do a topic, and get the topic from the kids - e.g. we looked at Japan for a month, because after the christmas holidays almost everyone had got a ds, so we decided to find out about nintendo and who created the games and followed lots of different paths about japan as a whole, the children were really interested in how different it was, the food, the school day, the earthquake practice (which was before the earthquake happened). we were looking at a website about japanese kids experimenting with art through their senses, and then as a class decided to have a messy art day, we sent out a letter and did it two days later, it wasn't everyones idea, but everyone loved it nevertheless.
    i still add in a bit of not so educational but the kids love it type stuff like ben10 stories and colouring in , or having ben10 figures in the smallworld area, but it's really hard on you as a teacher to go fully child led, as you cant split 30 ways, but there is usually some common ground for kids, which you need as a starting point, but then they look to you to plan where they go next. It's got tobe a compromise a bit, because there is so much for them to learn in the reception year, and the expectations are getting higher every year for where they should be by year one.
     
  6. Thankyou claw deer that makes Goode sense. I appreciate your views.
     
  7. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    I quite like having a broad topic as a starting point and getting the chidlren's ideas about what they are interested in. We have learnt all sorts of new things this year because of questions the children have asked. My favourites have been digestion, skeletons, steam trains, tractors (and what they are used for), creepy crawlies and dinosaurs. I think the TASC-type model of saying what we know, and talking about what we would like to find out and where we could get the information is a very powerful one.
     

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