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Determining the resistance of coastal salt marshes to extreme storms I Cambridge University

Discussion in 'Geography' started by AndrewvanZyl, Jul 15, 2020.

  1. AndrewvanZyl

    AndrewvanZyl Occasional commenter



    Salt marshes fringe much of the world’s low-lying coasts. They act as a first line of defence against storm surge waves, reducing storm water levels and the run up of waves on landward sea defences. As a result, vulnerable shorelines and engineered coastal defences are at lower risk of suffering under the impact of climate change, for example through sea level rise and intense storms. Little is known, however, of the resistance of these natural buffers to the continued battering by waves and tides and even less is known about what kind of storm it takes to erode these protective fringes, and thus leaving the coast and the populations living alongside it considerably more vulnerable. This short film explains how a team of Geographers and Geologists is planning to shed light on what makes salt marshes resistant to storm waves, using the latest remote sensing and soil scanning technologies alongside one of the world’s largest indoor wave flumes.

     

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