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Detailed Lesson Plans

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by paul_mc, Mar 4, 2009.

  1. Week in and week out apparently.
    I am planning my attack - there are only 24 hours in a day, so I will have to give up marking the books etc
     
  2. I don't do this and nor can I see a situation where I would make such a blanket request.
    Perhaps with an individual teacher if I had significant concerns but not for people clearly doing their jobs professionally and to a good standard.
    I certainly don't write my own lessons out in this way - I do the all the thinking and planning but the process of writing it all down would be less efficient and therefore my lessons would be of a lower standard due to time constraints.

     
  3. Maths_Mike

    Maths_Mike New commenter

    Simply refuse and quote teachers pay and conditions etc. Also suggest that actually writing schemes of work which include long medium and at least guidance for short term planning might actually be his job!!

    Or download some published ones and give him these.

    Sorry you are having to work for someone who has such a misguided view of what teachers need to do to be effective. I am always far more intrested on what actually goes on in the classroom as anyone can write a good lesson plan but not everyone teachers good lessons!

     
  4. Thanks people I will keep ya all posted!
     
  5. bigkid

    bigkid New commenter

    nut guidance on lesson planning

    Introduction .”
    Inspectors will look for evidence of good planning as part of their evaluation of the quality of teaching and learning. The DfES/OFSTED/QCA document says: “When OFSTED inspectors arrive they will look for clear objectives that show your intentions for what children will learn and how these objectives will be achieved. Inspectors will not expect to find a particular model or format for planning; they will be much more interested in the impact of planning on your teaching and the children’s learning.”
    <font size="3">32.</font> Despite the advice from OFSTED about planning, there are some inspection teams which continue to expect to be provided with plans which the Union believes to be unnecessary and over-detailed. Where members find that OFSTED teams have such expectations, they should contact their relevant NUT regional office immediately for advice. Sources of Further Information Where the issue cannot be resolved satisfactorily within the school, contact should be made with the NUT regional office or in Wales, NUT Cymru, for advice and support.
     
  6. bigkid

    bigkid New commenter

  7. Thanks bigkid.
    It hasn't happen and I hope that it doesn't.
    I have also heard of a school in our area that threatened to go on strike because their new head wanted to introduce detailed type-written lesson plans for all!
    Have a good weekend all.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Show him your planner - if it's like mine, it's a couple of short phrases and notes / reminders.
    I imagine he is looking to see how you plan, not feed back on your lessons in advance of you delivering them - he would not have time to do so and you would not be able to rewrite them in line with his 'guidance' in time.. ........
    Perhaps you should suggest he observes you in action instead - there is a limit to how much of that he can do too, of course.

    If it were me, I would simply refuse .........
    ..... but then, I don't care for micro-managers anyway.....
     
  9. annsue

    annsue New commenter

    Does anyone know what the position is on planning at secondary
    level? I always plan lessons, in my planner, with maybe a few
    scribbled notes on the side. During lesson I add comments to evaluate
    or mark stage where lesson ended. This then informs my next day's
    planning. I have tried and tried to plan lessons weekly in advance but
    always end up tweaking what I actually teach or even changing my mind
    completely. I do have a medium term plan but Deputy has now brought in
    a regime of ....to be e-mailed to Deputy by 12 noon Fri.:
    • detailed
      lesson plans for every lesson for week ahead to include individual
      student planning/progress/interventions/ role of support staff
    • all must show SEAL , differentiation, how TA's will be employed, walt, wilfs ( yes we are secondary!) etc etc
    • lesson plans from previous week annotated with evaluation of each lesson
    • golden lesson plans
    • weekly learning walks
    • work scrutiny- i.e. subject work for named students to be available for scrutiny by 14.10 each Tues
    • staff can expect to receive written feedback at the end of each week
      Am I justified in saying "no"?
     
  10. Nazard

    Nazard New commenter

    Oh my goodness. Betcha the Deputy wasn't ever a maths teacher.
    I can see that this might be just about manageable if you teach a non-core subject, have an hour week with every Yr 7 tutor group and can therefore plan maybe 8 hours of lessons and teach them all multiple times.
    When you teach maths to groups that are set you can find that you teach 20+ hours that are completely different!
    Also - if you teach one or two lessons per week to each group then you won't get far out of whack with your advance planning if other things crop up in the lesson. If you have three or four lessons a week then things have to be more fluid ...
    I would think so!

     
  11. Let's do the mathematics of it.
    We have about 75 teachers working, on average 20 lessons per week. Judging by what you are being expected to write, that looks like 1 page of plan for each lesson.
    75 x 20 = 1500 pages
    Assume that your Deputy Head reads at the rate of 2 minutes per page it will take him/her 3000 minutes or 50 hours. If he/she starts reading as soon as the lesson plans arrive and has 2 hours sleep each night he/she will finish reading them at 4am on Monday morning.
    Don't you think you should feel really sorry for your deputy Head?
    Are you justified in saying no? Personally I'd be more tempted to say "B----cks!"
     
  12. DM

    DM New commenter

    Just go and work somewhere else. Hundreds of schools are crying out for mathematics teachers.
     
  13. Nazard

    Nazard New commenter

    Ha ha ha - like it!
    You have omitted this part, though:
    That will add another 15 minutes per member of staff ...
     
  14. He's just covering his back and ticking the requisite boxes.. One of the reasons that I retired early was the idea of putting lesson plans on the internet so that a) parents could see what their children are doing and b) supply (or other staff ) could teach the lesson. It was actually stated that if the lesson plan was detailed enough then other staff( ie anyone) could teach that lesson.
    No printable comment!
     
  15. It does beggar belief that there will be sufficient time to read all those lesson plans and comment on them. After all you should expect 'professional' comments to the standard you are being expected to give to the pupils.
    I think I might be tempted to try and get all the staff to submit really detailed lessons plans and swamp him in information. I suspect these kind of lesson plans would only be asked for 2 weeks in a row and then you could all go back to normal.
     
  16. annsue

    annsue New commenter

    Just arrived home for weekend and read all your comments. Thank you, you have made me laugh after a day that started at 8am briefing with " Thank you to those teachers who have already e-mailed their lesson plans to me.....blah, blah,...I expect the rest by 12 noon...blah, blah, learning walks will now include your SEAL lessons blah, blah, blah...escaped out of the side door as early as possible. Lessons will be planned ...probably Mon evening.
    Really, though, I am concerned about how to respond when I am challenged about this on Tues as I know I will be, or possibly named and shamed at briefing. I want to make a stand against this tyranny but it is hard when the other teachers are going along with it.
    P.S. I teach Secondary
     
  17. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    My response would be that to plan in advance like this would make AfL ineffective. How can you respond to what happened in lesson 1 when lesson 2 has already been planned? Everytime I try writing lessons in my planner in advance I end up with the tippex out because I have to make changes.
    I would recommend an approach to your Union Rep on this.
     
  18. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    I do not know how it works in state schools, but can you not simply tell him that you are not going to do them?
    In 14 years of teaching in the private sector I have never been asked for a lesson plan, a scheme of work or a plan of what I am doing. It is assumed by all concerned that as a qualified professional I can do my job, and do not need to be micromanaged all the time.
    Which is just as well. During teaching practice my lessons went very well ( or as well as a trainee teacher can be expected to perform I guess ) but my lesson plans were shockingly bad.
    Actually they were an insult to the paper they were written on.
     
  19. Does anyone know what the position is on planning at secondary level? I always plan lessons, in my planner, with maybe a few scribbled notes on the side. During lesson I add comments to evaluate or mark stage where lesson ended. This then informs my next day's planning. I have tried and tried to plan lessons weekly in advance but always end up tweaking what I actually teach or even changing my mind completely. I do have a medium term plan but Deputy has now brought in a regime of ....
    to be e-mailed to Deputy by 12 noon Fri.:
    • detailed lesson plans for every lesson for week ahead to include individual student planning/progress/interventions/ role of support staff
    • all must show SEAL , differentiation, how TA's will be employed, walt, wilfs ( yes we are secondary!) etc etc
    • lesson plans from previous week annotated with evaluation of each lesson
    • golden lesson plans
    • weekly learning walks
    • work scrutiny- i.e. subject work for named students to be available for scrutiny by 14.10 each Tues
    • staff can expect to receive written feedback at the end of each week
      Am I justified in saying "no"?
    Annsue this is crazy but alas unless you work in the same school as me, my school is just as crazy because we are now to do the same. Evenings and weekends are now spent doing this and all I can say is that its actually had a negitive effect on my teaching, especially because on the learning walks we have to be able to say where we are on a plan right up to the minute and are answerable if we are not teaching what is says on the plan at that given minute. The kids are saying the lessons are too restrictive - at times they want to know more or make comment that adds an extra dimension to the lesson, now however we move them on.
    My school are doing this because they belive its what OFSTED want to see. I really hope that OFSTED have more sense.
    Feedback for every lesson is expected. I wish someone would explain what putting this into writing achieves for my pupils? I make little notes on my pupils to add their progression but we are asked to make notes on every child and whether they reached their target level that lesson.

    Someone please tell me if OFSTED are really interested in this or are is my SMT making work for works sake. Its 12.29 and I have just finished writing up all my lessons from last week. I started this morning at 11. We face competency if we do not carry out all on annsue's list.
    Is this becoming the norm?
    Pinkasdasky

     
  20. DM

    DM New commenter

    Oftsed are not remotely interested in this sort of ridiculous micro-management. I strongly advise you to seek empoyment elsewhere at the earliest opportunity. Make sure you request an exit interview with the Chair of Governors when you do leave.
     

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