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Demotion

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by marmitemate, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. marmitemate

    marmitemate New commenter

    So, through no fault of my own
    (Honest) and to the utter dismay of my colleagues I've been demoted after a few months in a new role! Now feel utterly useless and pride and professionalism has taken a massive knock... There has been no concern from the person that made the decision about my mental health etc.. Which for the first time ever has taken a blow.. Its a struggle to keep getting back up everyday...

    How do I get out of this mess that wasn't my fault? Will future employers look at this with concern??
     
  2. Dyathinkhesaurus

    Dyathinkhesaurus New commenter

    Last edited: Dec 18, 2018
  3. frustum

    frustum Star commenter

    Impossible to say without knowing more, which you probably shouldn't post as it might identify you. I would have thought that your references will count for more than your exact job title. If the post disappeared because they restructured, you can say that. In future applications, you need to find a way to put a positive spin on what happened, but avoid being negative about the school, and then concentrate on why you are applying for that post and what you can bring to it.
     
  4. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter

    Good advice in posts 2 & 3.

    I'd suggest you decide 's*d the b*st*rds, I'll show them...' , put your head down and do the new job as well as possible, acting totally professionally but with an eye on leaving the school, so do tasks that you can show off on your CV/in any application form.

    The above will put you in a stronger position to insist on a good reference when you (perhaps next year) start applying elsewhere.

    [If it's any consolation something similar, but worse, happened to me. Feel free to 'start a conversation' with me if you want to discuss it privately].
     
  5. grumpydogwoman

    grumpydogwoman Star commenter

    There must be a reason.

    It could be that there's insufficient work (so they believe) to merit the post.
    It could be it was only ever temporary but you may, in your enthusiasm, have misunderstood.
    it could be any one of a million things. That might include a perception that you're not a good fit for the role.

    You need to ask!

    Even if you're deemed not quite the right person to do the job? Doesn't make you a failure.

    They should have explained it to you. The fact they didn't could mean:
    a/they're a bit useless
    b/they really didn't think it was that big a deal
    c/they are too embarrassed to have a conversation with you

    You see though? You can go round in circles in this and the only resolution is to ask and get an answer. Worst case scenario? They thought you weren't as great as you felt you were. But it doesn't sound as if you've been subjected to a public dressing-down. It's a bit of hurt pride and you'll get over that. It wasn't handled terribly well. Things should have been explained.

    But don't make a song and dance about it on a CV! No need.
     
  6. IanG

    IanG Occasional commenter

    In your previous post:

    Therefore I assume the school have made the decision to reduce your role and support you as not meeting their standards?
     
  7. thejudgesscoresarein

    thejudgesscoresarein Established commenter

    It seems like you need to get out of this school as quick as you can as I feel that if you don’t, the situation at work will only get worse and this can cause a major jeopardy on your career.
    With schools breaking up for Christmas this week, use the 2 weeks or so that you have off to decide what it is you want to do with your career going forward. Don’t forget if you want to get out at Easter, you only have until February half term to resign.
    If, when it comes to January, you are having anxiety attacks about going back to work, then I suggest that in the best interests of both parties, that you are signed off from work citing WRS.
    I shouldn’t go against you when applying for new jobs, but new employers may ask for the amount of sick days you’ve taken in the last year. If you’re upfront and honest, you should be fine.
    In regards to the demotion, you could mention that it was the best interests for your health that you stepped down/demoted, but be careful though, if you are applying for the position you were demoted from in your current school, they will question as to why you want to step back up, you have got to be prepared to give answers.
     
    agathamorse and JohnJCazorla like this.
  8. marmitemate

    marmitemate New commenter

    Thanks, if I went on supply do you think that would reflect poorly when I apply for SLT roles??This whole thing is mad.. I actually got an NPQH last year - now I'm looking at supply...

    QUOTE="thejudgesscoresarein, post: 12694182, member: 24907670"]It seems like you need to get out of this school as quick as you can as I feel that if you don’t, the situation at work will only get worse and this can cause a major jeopardy on your career.
    With schools breaking up for Christmas this week, use the 2 weeks or so that you have off to decide what it is you want to do with your career going forward. Don’t forget if you want to get out at Easter, you only have until February half term to resign.
    If, when it comes to January, you are having anxiety attacks about going back to work, then I suggest that in the best interests of both parties, that you are signed off from work citing WRS.
    I shouldn’t go against you when applying for new jobs, but new employers may ask for the amount of sick days you’ve taken in the last year. If you’re upfront and honest, you should be fine.
    In regards to the demotion, you could mention that it was the best interests for your health that you stepped down/demoted, but be careful though, if you are applying for the position you were demoted from in your current school, they will question as to why you want to step back up, you have got to be prepared to give answers.[/QUOTE]
     
  9. thejudgesscoresarein

    thejudgesscoresarein Established commenter

    I don’t think it would look bad because at least there is no ‘void’ in your employment history. You have a better chance if you stay in some sort of employment than not having a job.
    People look down on supply teachers and try to categorise that they are only substitute teachers because they aren’t any good, but I know many outstanding teachers who spend a year or so as a supply teacher because they don’t want the stress or responsibility that a full time permanent teacher would bring.

    What I’m saying to you is though, you will have to declare that you stepped down or demoted because this will come to light anyway when the school contacts your current one for a reference, it’s best that your honest and not deceitful but if you’re applying for the same job or higher than the one you were demoted from, you need to be confident in your answers, otherwise you will probably stand no chance in getting the job.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  10. IanG

    IanG Occasional commenter

    If you are thinking of leaving and going on supply, then consider would it be best to leave at Easter or stick it out till the Summer. Worth finding out if there is a demand for your subject in the your area...science, maths and english always at a premium. Also theres nothing to stop you looking around and applying for another permanent role is something catches your eye.

    But as others have said you will have to use your current headteacher as a reference, will this be a problem? Might it be best to stick it out and try get SLT on side?
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  11. Leigh1999

    Leigh1999 New commenter

    This needs to be unpicked....

    Was the role you were demoted from a temporary appointment? If it was then I’m afraid you have to suck it up. Your only recourse is to go and see the Head and ask why you’ve been demoted. You can then work on any areas for further development (I.e weaknesses) over the coming months.

    If it wasn’t, then you again need to speak to the Head and have a frank and professional discussion about why you were demoted. You say it was through no fault of your own, but is this your interpretation or an objective judgement. Would your Head agree with your assertion here? If it was because of a restructure, then you’ve really lost no ground in your career as long as any refs you get support this. The tone of your post leads me to believe that this was not the case.

    The opinions of your colleagues are not relevant. The fact that you have referred to them here leads me to believe that you are desperately seeking support for your own beliefs about why you were demoted. You’re obviously very emotional about the situation and this will not help you address it in a useful way.

    I’m afraid I can’t agree with the view that resigning and going on supply won’t damage your career. You are unlikely to be appointed to a SLT position having resigned from your present position. Too many questions will be raised as to why you felt you needed to do this. There is huge competition for SLT jobs and interview panels will not include you but rather pick “safe” candidates- in other words candidates who have no question marks against their CVs.

    In your position I would take one of the following courses-

    1) Go to your Head and discuss with them what they might be able to say about you in a reference (e.g. you did x role for y amount of time with z results), and then apply for jobs but focusing on a sideways move

    2) Overcome your frustration with your present workplace and work hard to get back on SLT, perhaps in another capacity? In other words suck it up, remember that you still have the strengths that caused you to be appointed to the role you lost, and focus on the future.

    Either way, try and enjoy the rest of your holiday and I wish you the best for the remainder of the academic year.
     
    JohnJCazorla and Sundaytrekker like this.
  12. Scintillant

    Scintillant Star commenter

    If you like teaching, then teach. Teachers are useful.

    We have enough managers in schools and not enough teachers.
     
    mothorchid and Orchid2457 like this.

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