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delivering an engaging lesson

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by suzetteew, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. I am an overseas trained teacher from the caribbean,I am having problem delivering a GOOD lesson as I have not been trained in the UK. My observation are all satisfactory with many good features. My ambition is to be a GOOD teacher with holpe of becoming OUTSTANDING one day. What is missing? What is it that I am not doing? Back home I receive an award for 'TEACHER OF THE YEAR' I have watch other teachers in action and they are not doing anything great that i am not doing, so what makes them GOOD and me SATISFACTORY.( Is their a bias here against overseas trained teachers)
     
  2. I am an overseas trained teacher from the caribbean,I am having problem delivering a GOOD lesson as I have not been trained in the UK. My observation are all satisfactory with many good features. My ambition is to be a GOOD teacher with holpe of becoming OUTSTANDING one day. What is missing? What is it that I am not doing? Back home I receive an award for 'TEACHER OF THE YEAR' I have watch other teachers in action and they are not doing anything great that i am not doing, so what makes them GOOD and me SATISFACTORY.( Is their a bias here against overseas trained teachers)
     
  3. If there was a bias then they wouldn't have hired you. It's not very professional to say things like that. I didn't train in the UK and haven't found any problems except for the masses of paperwork teachers here are expected to do.

    Look at your lessons- are you considering SEN, EAL and G&T learners. What about your teaching styles? Are you including a range of teaching including providing for visual and auditory and kinesthetic learners? What about assessment methods- are there assessment opportunities in each lesson. Why don't you sit down with a colleague in your dept and compare how they would do a lesson. You said that they're not doing anything different to you but maybe there's something you're not looking out for and missing?
     
  4. rc07

    rc07 New commenter

    Ask others in your school - you are obviously keen to improve and your enthusiasm for your own development should be noted and supported by your managers. Ask them for clear, specific feedback on your lessons with their suggestions as to what they would have done. Get hold of descriptors of what is defined as a good lesson and next time you are observed make sure you can state exactly how you are meeting this criteria. Your school should have these.
    I am sure there is no bias against you, it must be challenging though to adapt to what is generally acknowledged to be a difficult job. You just need time to adjust to what is expected. You say you are already getting lots of good features of your lessons so you are doing well.
     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    You should have written feedback from your observations that will tell you this. If not you need to ask for it. We cannot possibly tell you which good and outstanding bits are missing from your lessons.

    I would say that my perception is that lessons in England are very different from those in the Caribbean and therefore what you think of as good may not be what we think of as good. what you think of as poor may not be what we think of as poor. No one gives a flying fig where you trained, but they do want you to teach good and outstanding lessons to our criteria. (Which may not be at all better than those you are used to, just different.)

    Ask your mentor, head of department, deputy head, whoever to observe you with the specific focus of looking to see what you need to do to make the lesson good rather than satisfactory.
     

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