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Dehumidifier

Discussion in 'Personal' started by grandelf, Dec 13, 2011.

  1. grandelf

    grandelf New commenter

    Just after some advice really.

    Having bought a dehumidifier this weekend in a bid to stop the flat getting damp, grotty, mouldy and cold this year I was after some tips, esp on the running times needed for them.

    I have been running the machine now since Saturday, taking about 2 litres of water out of each room every 12 hours (swapping between the bedroom in the day time and living room at night)

    Any ideas on how to use the machine well and keep running costs down, as I'd rather not run the machine 24 hours all day every day.
     
  2. grandelf

    grandelf New commenter

    Just after some advice really.

    Having bought a dehumidifier this weekend in a bid to stop the flat getting damp, grotty, mouldy and cold this year I was after some tips, esp on the running times needed for them.

    I have been running the machine now since Saturday, taking about 2 litres of water out of each room every 12 hours (swapping between the bedroom in the day time and living room at night)

    Any ideas on how to use the machine well and keep running costs down, as I'd rather not run the machine 24 hours all day every day.
     
  3. I'm no expert, but that seems to be a lot of water in the atmosphere. Is your flat in a basement?
     
  4. grandelf

    grandelf New commenter

    Nope ground floor, 50's build. The walls are exposed as we are an outside flat in the block.

    I think they generally have a ventilation issue, as there have been vent put into the walls etc in both the bedroom and the living room. Plus most other flats in the group (about 60 of them) seem to have a high level of condensation on their windows etc in a morning
     
  5. colpee

    colpee Star commenter

    Ideally there will be settings to chose e.g. time on and running time. I would put it on when you know humidity will be higher such as running showers, cooking etc; regular wet washing is also a classic cause of higher humidity. I suppose it depends on why your flat gets damp -if its cause is domestic then the dehumidifier, decent extractor fans and perhaps a change of habits will help very quickly and you will find you use the dehumidifier less over time. If it's a structural dampness problem, a dehumidifier will keep the mushrooms at bay but will not get rid of the problem.
     
  6. dande

    dande New commenter

    We have one and found the first week or so it was pulling out a lot of water. We live in a very wet part of the country! This has eased now and only getting about one third what we started with. However, we do have a new washing machine and this might be spinning the clothes better so less water in the house from washing drying!
     
  7. Weve got one, we put it on during shower/baths and for an hour or so afterwards. We dont have double glazing and get a lot of condensation on our windows.
     
  8. grandelf

    grandelf New commenter

    How often do you use it now Dande?


     
  9. Cestrian

    Cestrian New commenter

    Do you have Night-Rate electricity? You could set it to run when it's cheap.
     
  10. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    I agree with dande, that when first run the dehumidifier seems to pick up more than in subsequent weeks. We also alternate ours between sleeping and daytime areas. Opening a window, when cooking / after showering helps cut down on condensation forming in the first place and if at all possible try not to dry washing indoors ( pretty hopeless aim at present I agree!).
     
  11. dande

    dande New commenter

    We've moved it to other parts of the house. It seems to be less effective - so do think the new washine machine has made a difference!!!
     
  12. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Miss jubilee moved into a recently constructed garden studio flat in October and the double glazed windows were getting a lot of condensation. Then mould started forming behind furniture on the colder walls. The landlord has lent her the dehumidifier from his basement and she has it plugged in permanently at the moment.
    She was extracting 6 litres per 24 hours at first but it's now down to 4 litres. That's on top of the kitchen and the shower room having their own, wired in humidi- extractors.
    The main room (lounge/bedroom) is 20 foot by 10 foot. She has the central heating on whilst she is out to further dry out the building and prevent walls getting cold (which is when moisture condenses on them and causes the mould etc).
     
  13. mmm...Milk

    mmm...Milk New commenter

    My freinds hubby is an Architect, and gave us some advice on mold and condensation. A dehumidifier takes 1 month to dry out 1 inch of wall, and most external walls are 12" thick, so you are looking at a year of constantly on, not a good idea! The most effective way of dealing with excess damp is constant ventilation, a window locked open, or trickle vents in the window frames (depending on your windows). You may also have floor vents depending on your house or flat. A lot of homes (ours included) have had ventilation bricks blocked - this is the ones further up your walls rather than those that go under the house. Not sure about flats. Keep the bathroom window open after a shower / bath until the tiles are completely dry. Also, put that cellophane stuff you can get to make your windows double (or even tripple) glazed. I think you can get it in Wilko or the like.
    So saying, we are running a de humidifer when we have washing drying in the house and it does help with this. Ours is an eback one and can be set to run for so many hours, or kick in when the humidity reaches a certain point. All other advice given is also good, but apparantly the key is simply ventilation and insulation.
     

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