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Debating a move to Early Years... advice needed!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by star17, May 1, 2012.

  1. Hi all. I am currently a Year 2 Teacher. A member of staff in the Reception Class is leaving at my school and I am debating whether to ask the Headteacher if I could move to Early Years.

    I have taught in Nursery for 1/2 a term which I enjoyed but I am not Early Years trained. However, I am quite familiar with the planning and assessment organisation from when I taught in Year 1 and had to manage the transition, though obviously will still have loads to learn! I find the curriculum really inspiring and think I could do a good job but I haven't had a particularly good year and I'm worried it might just be a case of 'the grass looks greener on the other side' ...

    Does anybody have any positives/negatives about working in EYFS that they could give to help me make my decision?

    I realise that the new curriculum is coming out - do you think then it would be a wise/unwise time to move?

    Thanks :)
     
  2. Hi all. I am currently a Year 2 Teacher. A member of staff in the Reception Class is leaving at my school and I am debating whether to ask the Headteacher if I could move to Early Years.

    I have taught in Nursery for 1/2 a term which I enjoyed but I am not Early Years trained. However, I am quite familiar with the planning and assessment organisation from when I taught in Year 1 and had to manage the transition, though obviously will still have loads to learn! I find the curriculum really inspiring and think I could do a good job but I haven't had a particularly good year and I'm worried it might just be a case of 'the grass looks greener on the other side' ...

    Does anybody have any positives/negatives about working in EYFS that they could give to help me make my decision?

    I realise that the new curriculum is coming out - do you think then it would be a wise/unwise time to move?

    Thanks :)
     
  3. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    It's physically very demanding which, at my age , I am beginning to feel and some of the children despite being small are quite wild and untamed. However, I love getting the children off to a good start and their enthusiasm is wonderful.
    As for the impending changes to EYFS we have been told that 'good practice will still be good practice'.
     
  4. GemsEYFS

    GemsEYFS New commenter

    yes, i agree. VERY demanding job both physically and mentally.
    But, that being being said i would never wish to change my job.
    No day is ever the same, which keeps you on your toes! I see progress every minute of the day with different chidlren in different areas. You can teach the topics and subjects that really interest the chidlren and be very flexible with your planning. I love teaching in the early years. Having taught N, R and Year1.
    if you have the enthusiasm and the ability to just 'go with the flow' at times then go with it! I think it is a good time to change, you are aware of good practise which as previous post states will still be the same.
    Good luck! let us know your decision x
     
  5. I think this could be a very good time to move. There's training being delivered at the moment about the new EYFS so if you get it sorted quickly, you could get on that. This wouldn't normally be available so I'd say it's an ideal time to make the move, whilst the whole team is planning changes together: you could be part of that and feel much more comfortable when September comes.


    You say you haven't had a particularly good year. Were you thinking of moving to EYFS before this year? Was it always something you thought you'd want to do for your own professional development? It's generally good to get experience in more than one key stage, particularly if your ambitions run to senior management. If you enjoyed teaching in Nursery, this sounds like it could be a positive move. If you are worried about your Head's reaction (I'm assuming she knows you've not had a great year), you could say you've learned from this year and are ready for a new challenge. Outline the benefits of making the change this year, with the new framework etc, and see what he/she says.

    What is your gut feeling on this? Which decision would you regret - staying in Y2 or moving? If you feel you'd think you'd missed out by not asking, then I'd say definitely have the conversation at least.
     
  6. Thank you all so much for your helpful feedback. My 'not very good' year has been down to still being a fairly new teacher and having a difficult class with no support for a child with particularly challenging needs. My observations/book looks etc have gone well and I've tried to at least appear positive/happy on the outside even when I've have had a hard day so the Head probably doesn't see me as having had a 'bad year'. This is only my second year of teaching, hadn't considered move to Early Years before as did my training in KS1/KS2.

    Thanks again everybody for your advice :)
     
  7. Hi. I'm KS1/KS2 trained but completed my NQT in Reception. It was a HUGE learning curve but I have to say I enjoyed every minute of it. You learn more about child development than you could possibly learn in books or college and I think every teacher should do a stint in Early Years! I feel like I could teach any year group within Primary with a much better understanding of the children's journey.
    Go for it! You will love it! [​IMG]
     
  8. MissMistoffelees

    MissMistoffelees New commenter

    Cons- snotty noses, wet pants (and worse!), tears when mum leaves, having to repeat yourself 3 times to every single child before they'll all sit down, lots of training needed to do what would seem a simple task (e.g. putting a toy away without throwing it)
    Pros- children who are easily astounded and nearly constantly enthusiastic, flexibility to do what children are interested in, you can get involved in play and messy activities and so long as you're asking insightful questions the children will be learning, you hear the funniest things, daily hugs and compliments (e.g. "I like your hair" when you've just got it down instead of tied back!), progress which comes on in huge leaps and bounds, lots of fresh air with all the outside play; I could go on!
     

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