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Death and religion

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Teslasmate, Mar 22, 2019.

  1. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    People have given us so many wonderful things it seems silly to write most(?) of them off because they were inspired to some extent by religion.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  2. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    Except we do know. We end. The question is not 'what happens when we die', it's 'are comforting lies acceptable for small children'. She heard about Jesus because western culture is saturated with the mythology. Of course my relationship with her is more important, but I'd like to protect her from being infected with nonsensical ideas. I know you are a believer, and I wouldn't wish to insult. But I cannot give serious consideration to the ideas you hold to be true.
     
  3. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    They only repeat stuff about fairies and fairy doors if they are told about them or see them constructed or discovered. I enjoy guff like the tales of Achilles and Odysseus, or the Gods of the Norse (isn't the Ring completely ridiculous?) or the Fianna. It is the human condition and wonderful to contemplate. I think that pretending it doesn't apply is like trying to raise children as gender neutral rather than with and understanding of people.
     
    Vince_Ulam likes this.
  4. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    I think the difference is that I am confident she will stop believing in unicorns in her own time, because it will not be reinforced. There are plenty of people who seriously believe in god, Jesus, heaven and the truth of the bible. Reinforcement of ideas leads to them being accepted. I don't think I would be able to keep her entirely away from religious ideas until she can think logically for herself, but I would like to reduce how often she is taught nonsense.
     
  5. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    I think a child's environment can be too clean.
     
    monicabilongame and Vince_Ulam like this.
  6. sparklesparkle

    sparklesparkle Established commenter

    If you object to Christianity, why are you sending your child to a Christian school with a Christian head and Christian teachers?

    Wouldn't it have occurred to you that she might be exposed to Christianity at some point?
     
  7. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter


    In some parts of the country there is little or no choice.. (We had a choice between a C of E and a RC primary school, for example...)
     
  8. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    I think that is unreasonable. I think it's my duty to tell her the truth, which include the fact that many people believe many improbable things without evidence. I would argue that my worldview is not belief, it's the most likely reality taking all known facts into account.

    That's just pernicious. Children making up their own minds sounds so reasonable, but actually it's a wedge to teach religious ideas despite their being unreal. My daughter (and all children) trust adults to tell the truth. Filling their heads with lies is abuse. She should not have to filter what she's told, and indeed can't. I won't tell her what to believe, but I will always tell her the truth.

    There is nothing special about christian mythology. It was a christian country, now it is mostly not. It's fine that christianity is taught for historical and social reasons, but as an active mythology definitely not.
     
  9. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    You're probably right. It just offends me that religion might be getting it's claws in her.
     
  10. sparklesparkle

    sparklesparkle Established commenter

    Then you tell the school that your child is being brought up atheist and she isn't to take part in RE lessons, school assembly, celebrations of Christmas, Easter, etc.

    Have you done this, OP?
     
  11. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    Stuff being polite to religion. It's a set of ideas and deserves no respect whatsoever. The fact that religious people get offended when religious ideas are criticized is essentially their problem.
    There was a time that the church was in charge. It was (approximately) called the dark ages. I believe we should actively work to reduce the harm religion does, and ultimately religion needs to go away.
     
    Ivartheboneless likes this.
  12. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    It seems to be a feature that religions teach belief without even the rudiments of the central tenets of the faith. I was working in a muslim school last year, and I mentioned Mohammed going to heaven on a flying horse, most of them had no idea what I was talking about. In fact were calling me prejudiced. It's easier to believe if you don't get old what to believe. If you have facts about the core beliefs (jesus rose from the dead for example), then you can analyse them. No supernatural ideas stand up to scrutiny.
     
  13. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    She's already bright and questioning. I will encourage her to question what she is told about jesus. I would be surprised if she didn't see through it. The risk is, she might not.
     
  14. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    Yep, and it's appalling. For a start, it isn't. For seconds, lots and lots of not christians in those schools.
     
  15. sparklesparkle

    sparklesparkle Established commenter

    And yet you are sending your child to a Christian school, with a Christian head and Christian teachers.

    If you object so strongly to religion, why are you sending her to this school? Why are you encouraging her to "question what she is told about Jesus"? Wouldn't it occur to you that you are on a collision course and her long-term future at this school is untenable?
     
    Alice K likes this.
  16. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    Yep, this. The religious have been given a free reign in schools in return for a trivial amount of money.
     
  17. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    Very much yes.
     
  18. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    Very little choice, especially as she would be very hurt to be seperated from her friends. I am encouraging her to question, because she is being taught destructive lies. As for the long term, I survived 13 years of christian education and never succumbed. I really would rather she didn't have to.
     
  19. chelsea2

    chelsea2 Star commenter

    You do know that it was the Christian church which kept learning going through what you call 'the Dark Ages' (monasteries etc0?
    You do know the reason there are so many church schools (especially in villages) is that it was the churches who set up those schools in the first place, because there was no state education for the masses.
     
  20. Teslasmate

    Teslasmate Occasional commenter

    They taught reading and writing to further their authority. They presided over dirt, ignorance, superstition, hatred and fear. They were the worst kind of dictators, they won't just kill you they will condemn you to eternal torture.
     

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