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Dear Tom

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by TEACHER16, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. TEACHER16

    TEACHER16 New commenter

    I have recently taken over from a recent teacher and although we have spoken about rules and classroom expectations it is hard to take over a class. I have a few children who seem to just not care about school or rules and am looking for some advice about how to get them on board - how to get them to care about their work and their attitude to school and how to get them to work quietly and stay on task.
    The class did not have a traffic light system so I have introduced this but still there seems to be no consequence when they do go on amber because there was never any clear consequences before I took over the class. What is the norm for bad behavouir...is writing in a child's homework diary for parents to see a good idea?
     
  2. TEACHER16

    TEACHER16 New commenter

    I have recently taken over from a recent teacher and although we have spoken about rules and classroom expectations it is hard to take over a class. I have a few children who seem to just not care about school or rules and am looking for some advice about how to get them on board - how to get them to care about their work and their attitude to school and how to get them to work quietly and stay on task.
    The class did not have a traffic light system so I have introduced this but still there seems to be no consequence when they do go on amber because there was never any clear consequences before I took over the class. What is the norm for bad behavouir...is writing in a child's homework diary for parents to see a good idea?
     
  3. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    This may be a cold case, but I'll add my breath to the discussion :)
    It IS hard to take over a class. You need to instigate your own rules and regulations now. YOU are the law, not some distant ghost, of an echo, of a shadow, of a memory of the past. You are the guide and the sage for these kids.
    So make a consequence of your choice; a note in a planner is a good start. I think younger children need an immediate deterrent, so lost golden time, missed breaks, having lunch with you are all good, obvious ways to express displeasure and define boundaries.
    The norm is what you define; make the room your own, and very good luck to you.
    Read more from Tom here on his blog, or follow him.
     

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