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Dear Tom... detention overkill?

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by MisterW, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. MisterW

    MisterW New commenter

    If your expectations are reasonable then don't feel bad about punishing. If you have told a pupil what you expect and then warned them once (or twice as you say) then they can expect the detention. The thing to know about sanctions is that if it's done correctly then you will give fewer and fewer sanctions with time but this only happens if you are consistent and the punishment bothers the pupil enough. If a pupil know that they will get caught for misbehaving and does not want the punishment then they will not misbehave. Keep doing what you're doing, but if you're still giving out tonnes of detentions out months down the line then chances are you're not being consistent enough or the punishment does not sting enough.
    Being consistent often means handing out a lot of sanctions of first and then slowly the kids get the message. Inconsistensy often follows from a reluctance to give out too many sanctions but ironically these teachers give out more detentions in the long run as they experience poor behaviour week after week after week.
     
  2. jaimexuk

    jaimexuk New commenter

    Great, thank you. I just needed a bit of reassurance!
     
  3. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Use as many as you need. If you feel like you don't enjoy giving them, then good! They're unpleasant, but they're meant to be- to be a deterrent.

    Good luck
     
  4. ddavies193

    ddavies193 New commenter

    With your expectations draw up a classroom charter between you and the pupils. What they expect of you; exciting lessons, etc and what you expect of them and get them to agree 3 strike rule (many pupils will do this at the start) so when you are forcing detentions it has kinda come from the pupils too. With detentions I find ones low level disruption work best short and imediate like at a break time or lucnh time. If you carry it over a day or so pupils may even forget what the detention is for.
     
  5. I personally like to have a bit more freedom than that, I wouldn't want to be tied to a contract saying I can't punish a kid unless they've done 3 things, basically I'd feel I was giving them all the right to misbehave twice with impunity: in a class of 25 that's a lot of misbehaviour each lesson before you can even start doing anything about it! I just make clear at the start of the year that I'm the boss and then give sanctions as I see fit. It makes for a toughish year in one's first year at a new school, but it gets much easier after that. Noone now would ever say to me "that's not fair I was only bad twice".
     
  6. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Do not do this. ^
    Contracts/charters/similar are meaningless to pupils who wish to disrupt lessons. This kind of activity implies that the rules are up for debate - they are not.
    You've already taken the best approach OP, they're your rules and it's your domain they're entering (even if they've been at the school longer than you). I do think 3 strikes is too generous though, for the same reasons that fortasse has given.

    Also,
    "exciting lessons" should not be an expectation for pupils. Some things are just difficult. You can only commit to helping them learn, not to making their lives exciting.
    This bit is right; immediate detentions are best whenever possible (however, 2 minute detentions are totally pointless - I have seen some teachers issue those).


     
  7. Random175

    Random175 New commenter

    Issuing detentions only improves the behaviour. Sometimes it may seem that it is a long haul but it works in the end. I agree with others 3 strikes and then a 10 minute detention - not harsh enough. By then they should be onto half an hour and some would say maybe more than that.
     

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