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Dear Tom: Behaviour Management

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by teacher19881993, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. Hello. I am an NQT and I am struggling with behaviour management. I have not yet been put on any special measures but II have had a few meetings and they have told me that they have concerns about my behaviour management in the lessons. They given me a few things to do regarding the beginning of the lesson and the end which I am doing.

    My main issue in the classroom is getting the class quiet to listen to an explanation. I am often hearing after an explanation 'I don't get it' I know this is mainly because I am continually having to stop and tell someone in my lesson to be quiet so an explanation is never full. I have put students on detentions for continually talking over me, but some students (the main talkative ones) do not see this as a punishment, they are happy to spend time with me over lunch.

    I was wondering if you could give me any top tips to get the students to stop with their consistent chatter as often in my lessons issues from outside seem to be brought in and take centre stage. Anything I could put in place in my classroom would be extremely helpful.
     
  2. Hello. I am an NQT and I am struggling with behaviour management. I have not yet been put on any special measures but II have had a few meetings and they have told me that they have concerns about my behaviour management in the lessons. They given me a few things to do regarding the beginning of the lesson and the end which I am doing.

    My main issue in the classroom is getting the class quiet to listen to an explanation. I am often hearing after an explanation 'I don't get it' I know this is mainly because I am continually having to stop and tell someone in my lesson to be quiet so an explanation is never full. I have put students on detentions for continually talking over me, but some students (the main talkative ones) do not see this as a punishment, they are happy to spend time with me over lunch.

    I was wondering if you could give me any top tips to get the students to stop with their consistent chatter as often in my lessons issues from outside seem to be brought in and take centre stage. Anything I could put in place in my classroom would be extremely helpful.
     
  3. kittylion

    kittylion Established commenter

    Your detentions need turning up a few notches. If they don't take them seriously, have them sitting in silence well apart from each other while you tidy up your stuff or get things out ready for next lesson. Don't allow them to use them as their own social time - take ownership of them yourself. Give them work to do if necessary - perhaps stuff they should have finished in class.

    Escalate to after school detentions - same thing - sit separately in silence.

    Ring parents of repeat offenders.

    Keep a record of detentions set, attended and of phone calls made
     
  4. It's not a bad thing that the pupils are letting you know they don't understand.
    Examine your methods - if you reflect honestly, you may find areas for improvement (e.g. are you giving too much information at a time? Too many instructions? - try "one thing at a time").
    Ask "did I explain that properly?", then get pupils to explain their understanding.
    Also, if "they" have concerns over your behaviour (classroom) management, then ask "them" for more support. Have a look at other teachers in action. Adapt what you see them doing well, to suit you.
    And run your room for the benefit of learning, not for pupils to see as a social area.

     
  5. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    IT'S CLOBBERING TIME!
    Your class need you to stand up to their challenges a bit more. It's always difficult when you're new, and classes smell that on you; some kids, alas, would defy the Tooth Fairy and Santa Claus were they to cover a lesson. It's perfectly natural. And needs nailing.
    1. Design lessons that require little explanation and quiet, if it's really so bad. There is nothing- whisper it- wrong with a few textbook/ worksheet style lessons. Have the aims on the board with a starter, and most of the class can get on. That frees you up to tackle kids who aren't working. Mention them by name; describe what you need them to do. Repeat. Anyone that doesn't comply gets to see you for some quality time.
    2. That quality time (some people call it detentions, I call it the learning zone. No I don't.) needs to be uncomfortable. Find something they DON'T like doing, and do it. There is nothing wrong with getting them to do work; or lines; or writing a letter of apology. Detentions are meant to deter; THAT'S the lesson kids are supposed to learn from them. The idea that they are some kind of 21st century learning space makes them redundant. We don't want them redundant. We want kids NOT to want to be in detention, so that they amend their behaviour in classes to avoid obtaining them. If the kids don't mind being there, then you might as well not do them.
    And if kids consistently muck about, the sanction needs to be escalated. Repetition brings the wrath of school down on them. It isn't cruel- it's a necessary part of getting kids into line so that they can learn and do well. They need it, whether they know it or not. And you're the one to supply it.
    Good luck
    Read more from Tom here on his blog, or follow him.
     

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