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Dear Tom: Arrrggghhhh!! Please help me.

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Countrygirl_78, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. Countrygirl_78

    Countrygirl_78 New commenter

    <font size="2">Hello, sorry if this comes out as a rant but I need some advice and feedback please. I find myself in a very difficult place as a new teacher. I have a student whose attitude and approach to my course is making the teaching relationship very difficult and I don&rsquo;t know what to do. I teach Year 12 BTEC and the only reason this student is in my class is because he's doing maths and English resits. He does not want to be there and makes it very clear. He is constantly negative and disrupts the class. </font>
    <font size="2">When I talk to him about the behaviour he says I'm picking on him. He constantly whines that everything is not fair and although he is more than able, will only to the minimum amount of work. His behaviour is starting in impact on the others. I have emailed the school about putting him on an action plan (which is in the process of being arranged) but I need some coping strategies. I know he is the student and I am the teacher but his negative / it's not fair behaviour really does wind me up. </font>
    <font size="2"> Please help me.</font>
     
  2. Countrygirl_78

    Countrygirl_78 New commenter

    <font size="2">Hello, sorry if this comes out as a rant but I need some advice and feedback please. I find myself in a very difficult place as a new teacher. I have a student whose attitude and approach to my course is making the teaching relationship very difficult and I don&rsquo;t know what to do. I teach Year 12 BTEC and the only reason this student is in my class is because he's doing maths and English resits. He does not want to be there and makes it very clear. He is constantly negative and disrupts the class. </font>
    <font size="2">When I talk to him about the behaviour he says I'm picking on him. He constantly whines that everything is not fair and although he is more than able, will only to the minimum amount of work. His behaviour is starting in impact on the others. I have emailed the school about putting him on an action plan (which is in the process of being arranged) but I need some coping strategies. I know he is the student and I am the teacher but his negative / it's not fair behaviour really does wind me up. </font>
    <font size="2"> Please help me.</font>
     
  3. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    Hmm, year 12- does he HAVE to be in lessons? I would send him out every time he's disruptive. Sounds like he's had enough warnings, so there's no reason for you not to get him out if he's disrupting the class. Seriously- make it clear that the next time he lets off gas in your room, he's out. He can sit with the Head of Year, or even just in a quiet space and work....or whatever.
    Also, don't think that Year 12s are beyond a detention, or getting the parents in- some of them only LOOK like young adults. The great thing about this stage in their school career is that while they may have to be in school until 18, it doesn't have to be in your room, not if they don't value it as a learning space.
    Also talk to your line management about the fact that he doesn't want to do your subject: coersion is rarely a good basis for education. Should he be there at all?
    Until then, just warm your cockles with the knowledge that you're not trapped in there with him...he's trapped in there with YOU. Send him out. For your sanity.
    Good luck
    Read more from Tom on his blog, or on his Twitter here.
     

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