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Dear Theo- What are they looking for during an interview lesson?

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by scats, Mar 24, 2009.

  1. Dear Theo, I have just got an interview for my dream job next week.
    I have to teach a 20 minute lesson of my choice to a full sized year 10 class and the headteacher will be observing.
    Now I know what I am doing in terms of lesson content but I was wondering what the head will be looking for in the lesson. The head is not within my subject specialism so I know that he will not know wether the content is right or not so what will he be likely to be looking for and what can I do to ensure that my lesson is absolutely amazing and that it gets me the job?
    Thanks,
    Scats
     
  2. Dear Theo, I have just got an interview for my dream job next week.
    I have to teach a 20 minute lesson of my choice to a full sized year 10 class and the headteacher will be observing.
    Now I know what I am doing in terms of lesson content but I was wondering what the head will be looking for in the lesson. The head is not within my subject specialism so I know that he will not know wether the content is right or not so what will he be likely to be looking for and what can I do to ensure that my lesson is absolutely amazing and that it gets me the job?
    Thanks,
    Scats
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Congrats, Scats, for getting that interview - your application certainly hit the button!
    Now for the lesson.
    My guess is that the Head will have been trained, and the best training is Ofsted-based, so he will have the Ofsted criteria in mind.
    Dunno why I bothered to include the Inadequate criteria - anyone who can write a good application is unlikely to plan and deliver an inadequate lesson.
    So you're looking for exceptional enjoyment and progress of the learners. If you have to prioritise, go for progress over enjoyment. And don't waste ANY time at the beginning - 20 minutes isn't long to mpress.
    What were the comments last time you had a lesson observation at your current school? That should show you the really good areas to consolidate, and any less good that need to be improved. Be wary of something too complicated that could fall flat on its face - one of the Teachers' TV programmes was called something like Moving from Good to Outstanding, and the MFL teacher prepared something just too complex for her second observation.
    And don't think that the Head will not know if the content is right or not. He won't know perhaps if you quote an incorrect fact, but he'll certainly know if it is causing the pupils to learn and progress!
    Very best wishes - let us know how you get on.
    Guidance on where to pitch judgements about the overall quality of a lesson
    The overall judgement will be a ‘best fit’ of the grade descriptions in the box, except in the case of an unsatisfactory lesson where particular conditions mean that the lesson cannot be satisfactory.
    Description Characteristics of the lesson
    Outstanding (1)
    The lesson is at least good in all or nearly all respects and is exemplary in significant elements, as shown by the exceptional enjoyment and progress of the learners.
    Good (2)
    Most learners make good progress because of the good teaching they receive. Behaviour overall is good and learners are keen to get on with their work in a secure and friendly environment in which they can thrive. The health and safety of the learners are not endangered. Teaching is well informed, confident, engaging and precise. The work is well matched to the full range of learners’ needs, so that most are suitably challenged. Teaching methods are effectively related to the lesson objectives and the needs of learners. Teaching assistants and resources are well deployed and good use is made of time. Assessment of learners’ work is regular and consistent and makes a good contribution to their progress.
    Satisfactory (3)
    The lesson is inadequate in no major respect, and may be good in some respects, as shown by the satisfactory enjoyment and progress of the learners.
    Inadequate (4)
    <font face="Times New Roman">A lesson cannot be adequate if: &bull; most learners, or a significant specific minority of learners, make less than satisfactory progress, whether this is due to unsatisfactory teaching or the impact of bad behaviour
    &bull; learners&rsquo; overall behaviour or attitudes are unsatisfactory, and the tone of the lesson is inimical to the development of learners&rsquo; personal qualities
    &bull; the health or safety of the learners is endangered
    &bull; the teaching is unsatisfactory. This will usually cause the learners&rsquo; progress to be unsatisfactory, but occasionally progress will be satisfactory in spite of the teaching due to the good attitudes of the learners.</font>
    Unsatisfactory teaching is likely to have one or more of the following:
    &bull; weak knowledge of the curriculum leading to inaccurate teaching and low demands on pupils
    &bull; work badly matched to the pupils&rsquo; starting points
    &bull; ineffective classroom management of behaviour
    &bull; methods which are poorly geared to the learning objectives or which fail to gain the interest and commitment of the learners
    &bull; inadequate use of resources, including assistants and the time available
    &bull; poor assessment.
    <font face="Calibri"> </font>
     

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