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Dear Theo: That deflated feeling after interviews

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by lovely.lady, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. lovely.lady

    lovely.lady Occasional commenter

    For me this happens every single time. Why? I know exactly why, at least I do now, it has come to me like a huge spotlight been switched on!
    I was interviewed by a panel of 3 - 2 Principals plus 1 Assistant Principal. They introduced the interview with " we have a set of 8 questions which will answer in turn..."
    When did choosing a teacher for a school suddenly turn into a production line? Anyone can rehearse and answer these questions without any prior experience of teaching. Sounding well versed in teaching pedagogy does not mean that you are (primary teacher here) caring, child-centred, instill confidence into less confident children, promote good standards, have high expectations, have good subject knolwedge etc etc etc. So why oh why do they ask such pointless dribble when in reality those who can produce text book answers to these questions are inevitably rubbish teachers. What does it prove?
    Evidence relating to teaching & learning, assessment regimes, presence in the classroom surely should come from a third party - ie the reference where the true personality of the individual should come from the interview. I honestly felt that I was on a production line in a factory - I got on the moving conveyor belt then was stopped, cut off because my time was up. What is to be done? Do interviewing panels actually need lessons on this? Do they need to be aware of the success criteria, how they will be assessed?
    Thoughts please?
     
  2. lovely.lady

    lovely.lady Occasional commenter

    For me this happens every single time. Why? I know exactly why, at least I do now, it has come to me like a huge spotlight been switched on!
    I was interviewed by a panel of 3 - 2 Principals plus 1 Assistant Principal. They introduced the interview with " we have a set of 8 questions which will answer in turn..."
    When did choosing a teacher for a school suddenly turn into a production line? Anyone can rehearse and answer these questions without any prior experience of teaching. Sounding well versed in teaching pedagogy does not mean that you are (primary teacher here) caring, child-centred, instill confidence into less confident children, promote good standards, have high expectations, have good subject knolwedge etc etc etc. So why oh why do they ask such pointless dribble when in reality those who can produce text book answers to these questions are inevitably rubbish teachers. What does it prove?
    Evidence relating to teaching & learning, assessment regimes, presence in the classroom surely should come from a third party - ie the reference where the true personality of the individual should come from the interview. I honestly felt that I was on a production line in a factory - I got on the moving conveyor belt then was stopped, cut off because my time was up. What is to be done? Do interviewing panels actually need lessons on this? Do they need to be aware of the success criteria, how they will be assessed?
    Thoughts please?
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    I am not sure that there is an actual JobSeeking question hiding in here for me to give you advice!
    Most panels have someone on them who is trained in interviewing, but equally, most people on most panels have little ot no training except, in a school not a college, CP training.
    No, you are generalising here - you cannot possibly have proof of this!
    They are trying to be fair to all applicants by asking the same questions.
    But references may not be 100% true. Anyone can write a flattering reference showing all of these things, and put just anyone's name in the space. You need to see the person in the flesh to judge what credence to give to the reference.
    You have had a horrid experience, and I'm sorry about that. I hope that the next one will be more professional and have a better outcome.
    Best wishes
    ___________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar on Saturday February 25th
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com
     

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