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Dear Theo... struggling with interviews!

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by islandme, May 14, 2011.

  1. I'm a trainee teacher struggling with the interview process - and to be honest, wondering if I'm ever going to be able to overcome it. I've applied for 6 Schools and have had 5 interviews. Up until now the only feedback I've had is that my lessons and interview had no problems, but I 'seemed nervous'. Nervous? In an interview? Really? I've felt like I'm getting better at dealing with my nerves at every interview, but my nerves are still always commented on during the feedback - which is unhelpful to be honest. I don't understand how people are NOT nervous at interviews!?
    At my last interview I performed well in the interview, but totally messed up my lesson - which is worse. However, I managed to survive the cut after lunch and was taken through the panel with 3 others. 24 hours later they called to tell me I didn't get the job because my lesson was only 'satisfactory' and they were looking for good or outstanding lessons. God knows why they didn't send me home half way through then then!? Maybe to amuse themselves!
    I understand the features of a good / outstanding lesson, but don't seem to have enough time to encorporate these things into 20 minutes. Time just seems to disappear once I'm in the classroom and I find myself rushing so much and not getting through half the things I've planned, I don't particularly understand how to show progression in 20 minutes - which must sound really stupid, but it's true! I've had good feedback throughout my course, but struggle to perform in the short space of time given. I've got another interview on Thursday and need some advice on how I can move on from this, as the hope of having a job for September is deminishing :(
    Thanks
    Rachel
     
  2. Sorry, don't really have any advice for you, as I am also an NQT struggling to get my first position, just wanted to say, WOW! - 6 applications and 5 interviews - that's very impressive! Where abouts are you applying? I'm lucky to get an interview out of every 6 or 7 applications!
    All the best for your interview on Thurs (unless of course where it's also where I'm being interviewed haha!)[​IMG]
     
  3. Applying for jobs in the South West - so very competitive - as everywhere seems to be at the momment! How about you? Trying to stay positive! Good luck for Thursday also...
     
  4. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    That lesson may well have been just a one-off. But if you want extra help on interview lessons, there's a great book available (fast if you pay extra!) from Amazon.
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    [​IMG]
    As for the interview - go to the Welcome thread open the Interview tips clickable. It is full of useful advice!
    Good luck
    _____________________________________________________________

    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.

    I
    do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the
    Job Application Workshops. We look at application letters, executive
    summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really
    appreciate.

    The next Job Seminars are all sold out, I'm afraid.

    E-mail Julia on advice@tsleducation.com for how to book a meeting with me personally.

    Look forward to seeing you!


     
  5. "I understand the features of a good / outstanding lesson, but don't seem
    to have enough time to encorporate these things into 20 minutes. Time
    just seems to disappear once I'm in the classroom and I find myself
    rushing so much and not getting through half the things I've planned, I
    don't particularly understand how to show progression in 20 minutes -
    which must sound really stupid, but it's true!"

    It's not at all stupid, it's true. I have no idea how to show progression in 20 minutes either, and actually I think it's a ridiculous demand. How can you ask an NQT who doesn't know the children in the class to teach a 20 minute lesson in which they show progression? It baffles me, I think it's the most bizarre thing to ask. I've been graded outstanding in my placements- I'm not suggesting I'm outstanding by Ofsted's measures as an NQT, of course not, but measured against other students I've been graded an outstanding trainee. I know how to ensure children make progress. Nevertheless, I still think that expecting a candidate to demonstrate "progression" in 20 minutes is plain silly. It's a snapshot. They can see how you interact with children, whether your lesson plan differentiates appropriately, whether you use support staff well or introduce concepts clearly. I just can't see how they can realistically expect genuine "progress" within 20 minutes, though. If it's so important to see progress, it would be far better to select fewer candidates and allow each one to teach a proper lesson, surely? [​IMG]
     
  6. Georgia99

    Georgia99 New commenter

    If it makes you feel any better, on my first interview I played it safe with the lesson and used worksheets. They weren't very impressed with my lesson.
    Second interview, I used a much more active lesson with cooperative learning groups, activities etc. and was told by my current head it was an outstanding lesson. But the interviewing school did not agree, rating it as 'average' and gave it to the candidate who used a series of worksheets!! The candidate who got the job was also extremely shy and quiet and spoke at 100 miles per hour!!

     

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