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Dear Theo - Returning to classroom after 5 year break

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by MegsMog, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. MegsMog

    MegsMog New commenter

    Shortly after qualifying as a teacher in 2005 and having interviews/working as a supply, I started a family, and so did not complete my NQT year.
    I am now thinking about how to get back into the classroom and update my knowledge. I would like to volunteer in my son's school from September and gradually come up to speed on current practice.
    I would appreciate any advice anybody could give on my situation and whether you think this would be enough to be considered for teaching posts in the future.
    Many thanks.
     
  2. MegsMog

    MegsMog New commenter

    Shortly after qualifying as a teacher in 2005 and having interviews/working as a supply, I started a family, and so did not complete my NQT year.
    I am now thinking about how to get back into the classroom and update my knowledge. I would like to volunteer in my son's school from September and gradually come up to speed on current practice.
    I would appreciate any advice anybody could give on my situation and whether you think this would be enough to be considered for teaching posts in the future.
    Many thanks.
     
  3. It is ABSOLUTELY the way to go about things. I have recently returned to teaching after a near 10 year break and the way I did it was by volunteering regularly in my children's school and it grew from there. Thankfully the staff at their primary school were amazing and so so supportive of me. They also really appreciated my knowledge and experience which they got for free every week for a couple of years.
    I'm not sure how you'll stand on not completing your NQT year. (I had already completed mine many years ago!) You may need to look into this further.
    Good Luck and Go for it. You have nothing to lose and your child's school will probably be very appreciative of your skills xx
     
  4. Hiya,
    I had a job lined up for September as an NQT but have since discovered I am pregnant and have retracted my contract as I didn't think it fair on the school to leave at October half term - I have until 12th July until I attend my graduation ceremony for the PGCE. However, I have completely run out of money - I got my last bursary installment today and it coeverd the overdraft I have run up in the last month! Do you know the earliest I can go to the jobcentre and 'sign on' before I start looking for temp jobs when I don't have anymore school work to do, to tide me over til baby is due in November?

    Many thanks
     
  5. jenini

    jenini New commenter

    Usually you can sign on from the date you finish being in full-time education. This may be before your graduation ceremony (my university didn't do our graduation ceremony until October but the course finished in June) so I would have a look on your university's website and see if you can find the course dates for this year.

    If your course has already officially finished then you should be able to start signing on straight away; you can fill out your claim online and your jobseekers allowance will start from the day you do the claim. In some circumstances JSA can also be backdated. If your course has not yet finished then I don't believe you can claim until it does, but you could telephone your local job centre to find out. As you are pregnant there may be other help available.

    If your course does not finish until July and you have completely run out of money and are worried about how you will manage the basics between now and signing on you may also be able to apply for an interest-free crisis loan. You don't have to be in receipt of benefits to apply for a crisis loan, although presumably you will need to provide evidence of some sort that you are in crisis to qualify.

    You can start your claim for JSA and look for information about crisis loans on the directgov website: http://www.direct.gov.uk
     
  6. dizzymai

    dizzymai New commenter

    Volunteering is a great idea. What about supply? That will get you back in the swing of it and if you get long term supply you could possibly attend INSET training- that will make your applications look better because you will need to finish your NQT year. I qualified in 2009 and already teaching has changed enormously! New ofsted criteria is the biggie and it is changing teaching practice - you will need to learn about this. Also things like APP,AFL and personlised learning.
    Good luck [​IMG]
     
  7. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Returning after a career break does put you at a disadvantage, so you will have to work even harder on your application. But it can be done, so don't despair!

    Firstly - are you now out of the loop, has the curriculum raced ahead while you have been on the sidelines? You need to get up to speed fast with this, and say so in your letter.

    Secondly - are you expensive? I hate to say it, but nowadays when schools are looking to save money, someone on M3 or UPS1 make different demands on the budget. So you need to be able to show them that you are worth the extra money.
    In your letter, make it clear that you are Value-For-Money. You are more experienced, so just emphasise this, show that you will hit the ground running, not need support, be in fact available to help and support other colleagues, produce and share materials, etc. Tell them what you would do as an extra, how employing you would be very much to the advantage of the school, of its teachers and its pupils. How you will raise achievement.

    And finally - don't ignore what you have done while out of teaching - it has given you extra skills too, some of which (time management, etc) are also relevant in the classroom.

    Starting back again with Supply teaching is ideal (although not ideal for last-minute child care), but it is very hard to get Supply work in most areas nowadays. Volunteering at a school, however, can often be arranged, and if you try to make it a real learning experience, can benefit you and make a good point in your application.
    Best wishes

    ________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice@tes.co.uk for one-to-one sessions.
     

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