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Dear Theo (or anyone else who can help),

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by Jimbo101, May 1, 2011.

  1. Dear Theo,
    I am applying for a job which I would be a very strong candidate, apart from one major aspect. I know this also will make it unlikely for me to get the job, but if you don't try you never know!
    I am currently off sick with depression and my contract is ending by mutual agreement on May 31st. My current head is very supportive of me, hence her allowing me to leave at short notice to recuperate and allow my family to relocate. The reasons for my depression are not caused by the school or the job either.The reference she will provide will be mixed, she is an honest woman so will put down where my performance was negatively impacted by my condition, but will also write very good aspects where I have performed consistently well at work.
    I am unsure how to proceed with this application and the best way to handle my health record and this is what I would like your thoughts on.
    If I complete the application correctly and fully then the prospective employers probably will not find out about my current situation until they receive my references. There is even the slim chance they won't find out about it until after they (theoretically) have appointed me. At least that would be to the strictest letter of the Equality Act 2010. I am not concerned with the legalities of that though as realistrically I also know a head has to employ people who are fit to do the job, which I know I will be when it starts in September.
    So my thoughts so far are as follows:
    1) Complete an application, go for a visit to the school with it completed, but no mention of my illness, and ask to speak to the eadteacher while there. Be totally honest and upfront about my situation and leave it up to him from that point onward. (Knowing that if he still considers my application and gives me aninterview then he is understanding, if he doesn't I probably don't want to work there anyway)
    2) Complete and send in my application, but include in the letter about my illness but highlight the positive effects of my recovery.
    3) Not mention it, as I am entitled to do and it won't be fraudulent, and expect to answer questions about it if I was to get an interview.
    Just to be clear I have had it confirmed by an Occupational Health Doctor and a specialist lawyer that I am covered by the Equality Act so legally cannot be discriminated against for it. Although in reality an employer also needs to ensure they are employing a suitable candidate.
    I favour the first option personally as I think if they were to meet me in person they would see I wasn't a dribbling wreck and I am sure it would be a positive first impression.
    Any thoughts or advice happily received,
    Jamie

     
  2. Dear Theo,
    I am applying for a job which I would be a very strong candidate, apart from one major aspect. I know this also will make it unlikely for me to get the job, but if you don't try you never know!
    I am currently off sick with depression and my contract is ending by mutual agreement on May 31st. My current head is very supportive of me, hence her allowing me to leave at short notice to recuperate and allow my family to relocate. The reasons for my depression are not caused by the school or the job either.The reference she will provide will be mixed, she is an honest woman so will put down where my performance was negatively impacted by my condition, but will also write very good aspects where I have performed consistently well at work.
    I am unsure how to proceed with this application and the best way to handle my health record and this is what I would like your thoughts on.
    If I complete the application correctly and fully then the prospective employers probably will not find out about my current situation until they receive my references. There is even the slim chance they won't find out about it until after they (theoretically) have appointed me. At least that would be to the strictest letter of the Equality Act 2010. I am not concerned with the legalities of that though as realistrically I also know a head has to employ people who are fit to do the job, which I know I will be when it starts in September.
    So my thoughts so far are as follows:
    1) Complete an application, go for a visit to the school with it completed, but no mention of my illness, and ask to speak to the eadteacher while there. Be totally honest and upfront about my situation and leave it up to him from that point onward. (Knowing that if he still considers my application and gives me aninterview then he is understanding, if he doesn't I probably don't want to work there anyway)
    2) Complete and send in my application, but include in the letter about my illness but highlight the positive effects of my recovery.
    3) Not mention it, as I am entitled to do and it won't be fraudulent, and expect to answer questions about it if I was to get an interview.
    Just to be clear I have had it confirmed by an Occupational Health Doctor and a specialist lawyer that I am covered by the Equality Act so legally cannot be discriminated against for it. Although in reality an employer also needs to ensure they are employing a suitable candidate.
    I favour the first option personally as I think if they were to meet me in person they would see I wasn't a dribbling wreck and I am sure it would be a positive first impression.
    Any thoughts or advice happily received,
    Jamie

     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    I´m sorry that you have been having a difficult time, and hope that it will soon all be behind you.
    I feel that a combination of 1 and 2 would be best for you. My personal view is that someone who has gone through and conquered depression is now in a better position to face up to the stresses of a teaching job. This is, I think, the point that you would be wishing to make.
    I always advise coming clean in an application about anything that is slightly unusual, such as being unemployed, as if you don´t then they only imagine the worst possible scenario. So briefly set out the facts.
    As for the Equality Act, you are doubtless aware that it actually contradicts other legislation. Daft. https://community.tes.co.uk/forums/p/481506/6673408.aspx#6673408
    Hope you get 100% fit very soon.
    Best wishes
    _____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Workshops. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    By popular demand! In response to Tessers e-mailing in: another Job Seminar now on Saturday 14th May:
    www.tesweekendworkshop25.eventbrite.com
    The next Moving onto Leadship seminar is Sunday 15th May.
    http://tesweekendworkshop24.eventbrite.com/
    E-mail Julia on advice@tsleducation.com for how to book a meeting with me personally.
    Look forward to seeing you!
     

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