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Dear Theo - new problem!

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by princesstulip, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. princesstulip

    princesstulip New commenter

    Thank you again for the application advice you gave me a few days ago. Since then another issue has arisen which I hadn't anticipated and haven't been able to find a proper answer to.
    I'm an NQT applying for positions in London starting in January. I started a part-time MA in education in September at a university in a different city - it's where I took my PGCE, I was offered a place early on and it was easy to transfer my MA credits. It was also very financially beneficial to start the course this year. It does mean though that one day (or afternoon) each month until May I need to travel there for a lecture for the compulsary module.
    I hope this won't be a huge problem for the right headteacher, who might appreciate my efforts for further education and allow me to negotiate with NQT time or whatever rather than see it as a barrier to me working. My former PGCE mentor advised me to bring it up during school visits to judge whether it is worth applying to schools and warned me that it's likely schools will be extremely unhappy if I apply without letting them know.
    However, when I explained during my first school visit yesterday, the head seemed worried and said that I wasn't obliged to tell him and it can't be considered during the selection process under equal opportunities laws. I now have no idea where I actually stand - whether what he said applies only to his school or that London Borough and may not apply elswhere, whether I should tell headteachers before applying or not and whether in reality I will be offered a full-time position when I need this extra time off.
    Is there anywhere I can find a definitive answer so that I know my rights in this situation?


     
  2. princesstulip

    princesstulip New commenter

    Thank you again for the application advice you gave me a few days ago. Since then another issue has arisen which I hadn't anticipated and haven't been able to find a proper answer to.
    I'm an NQT applying for positions in London starting in January. I started a part-time MA in education in September at a university in a different city - it's where I took my PGCE, I was offered a place early on and it was easy to transfer my MA credits. It was also very financially beneficial to start the course this year. It does mean though that one day (or afternoon) each month until May I need to travel there for a lecture for the compulsary module.
    I hope this won't be a huge problem for the right headteacher, who might appreciate my efforts for further education and allow me to negotiate with NQT time or whatever rather than see it as a barrier to me working. My former PGCE mentor advised me to bring it up during school visits to judge whether it is worth applying to schools and warned me that it's likely schools will be extremely unhappy if I apply without letting them know.
    However, when I explained during my first school visit yesterday, the head seemed worried and said that I wasn't obliged to tell him and it can't be considered during the selection process under equal opportunities laws. I now have no idea where I actually stand - whether what he said applies only to his school or that London Borough and may not apply elswhere, whether I should tell headteachers before applying or not and whether in reality I will be offered a full-time position when I need this extra time off.
    Is there anywhere I can find a definitive answer so that I know my rights in this situation?


     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Equal opportunities law?
    I just don't know what he's talking about, I'm afraid.
    As far as I know, and I am no lawyer, the Equality Act covers gender (it's not because you're a woman, is it?), sexuality, race, religion, disability, age . . .
    So how on earth does this study leave fall into one of those categories?
    My feeling is that mentioning it before you apply (or having a paragraph in your application about your studies, and briefly mentioning this commitment), is still a good idea.
    Best wishes.
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  4. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    He's talking rot. As Theo says, equal ops doesn't include those who want a day off a week for study purposes.
     
  5. princesstulip

    princesstulip New commenter

    Thank you. Yes, it sounded very strange and I will ignore it and continue to tell schools. Hopefully one headteacher out there will think I'm doing something worthwhile and not see needing half a day off a month as an impossible barrier to working.
     

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