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Dear Theo Interview let down

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by Kitten999, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. Kitten999

    Kitten999 New commenter

    I recently applied for a KS2 job share. My current Head said my personal statement was very good and that I'd sold myself well. I was short listed and given an interview date. I think only 3 got to this stage. The Head's brief for the lesson was 20 minutes mental maths warm up, in an unset year 4 class, no planning needed, the head wanted to see if the children liked me and I liked them. All very informal.

    I did 3 different warm ups to keep the pace, lots of individual whiteboard work, discussion on how they came by answers and children coming to the front to demonstrate understanding. I felt it went well and the class responded well. The head didn't sit in though, it was the deputy. I don't know if the deputy was in on the original brief. The spoken part seemed to go well. I was able to draw on many examples and speak at length (in the past my weakness has been inadequate answers). Lots of nodding of heads, note taking, murmurs of agreement, smiles. Then they asked would I consider KS1 but not specify the role. They were unable to say what year group I would be teaching in KS2 or who i would be working with. They asked if I would accept the job if offered it. Foolishly I walked out on a cloud of hope!

    A short call later that day said I hadn't been successful, no wish to give feedback, just a comment about it being the taught part. I later heard on the quiet that instead they have taken on a floating supply teacher and that two separate job share teachers (who both lost their teaching partners) will be combined for one class.

    Was there ever actually a job going in this school? Did they only advertise because they had to, knowing the jobs can be filled internally? I feel rather cross as if I have been duped in some way. Should I speak to the head to air my concerns, especially as it was her brief and she wasn't in on any part of the interview. Or leave well alone?
     
  2. Kitten999

    Kitten999 New commenter

    I recently applied for a KS2 job share. My current Head said my personal statement was very good and that I'd sold myself well. I was short listed and given an interview date. I think only 3 got to this stage. The Head's brief for the lesson was 20 minutes mental maths warm up, in an unset year 4 class, no planning needed, the head wanted to see if the children liked me and I liked them. All very informal.

    I did 3 different warm ups to keep the pace, lots of individual whiteboard work, discussion on how they came by answers and children coming to the front to demonstrate understanding. I felt it went well and the class responded well. The head didn't sit in though, it was the deputy. I don't know if the deputy was in on the original brief. The spoken part seemed to go well. I was able to draw on many examples and speak at length (in the past my weakness has been inadequate answers). Lots of nodding of heads, note taking, murmurs of agreement, smiles. Then they asked would I consider KS1 but not specify the role. They were unable to say what year group I would be teaching in KS2 or who i would be working with. They asked if I would accept the job if offered it. Foolishly I walked out on a cloud of hope!

    A short call later that day said I hadn't been successful, no wish to give feedback, just a comment about it being the taught part. I later heard on the quiet that instead they have taken on a floating supply teacher and that two separate job share teachers (who both lost their teaching partners) will be combined for one class.

    Was there ever actually a job going in this school? Did they only advertise because they had to, knowing the jobs can be filled internally? I feel rather cross as if I have been duped in some way. Should I speak to the head to air my concerns, especially as it was her brief and she wasn't in on any part of the interview. Or leave well alone?
     
  3. Kitten999

    Kitten999 New commenter

    PS The school I was interviewed at is a different one from where I am at present working.
     
  4. catbefriender

    catbefriender Lead commenter

    Sorry Kitten, I'm as dumbfounded as you are. You know what, because it's doing my head in and I didn't even go through it, I think you should just say, 'Thank you Lord for the lucky escape.' In an environment like that you would never know whether you were coming or going. It really was a case of giving two different messages. I would say move forward and don't waste your precious intellect trying to figure this one out. Best wishes...
     
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    I'm sorry that you have had such a disappointing and frustrating experience, Kitten. Really sad for you.
    But also, I don't feel that anything can be gained by you speaking to the Head.
    Why do you have concerns? In what way do you think that you have been duped?
    This is fairly standard practice on the part of the interviewers. If they glared at you, or shook their heads instead of nodding, you would be put off your stride. This is their body language to be encouraging, to enable you to feel less nervous in the interview so that you can do your very best.
    This again is a fairly standard thing, to ask everybody this. i never bother, because no-one is going to say No, and if they do say Yes, you can't hold then to it anyway, so why bother asking? But lots of schools do ask this.
    I feel that you have read too much into these two things, I'm afraid, and this explains your euphoria:
    And, of course, your subsequent disappointment.
    I can understand that you feel let down, but believe me, there is absolutely nothing to be gained by talking to the Head to complain, however mildly and politely, about her brief not being carried out, in your view. If you did contact her, what could she do? Un-appoint one of the others and appoint you instead?
    Course not.
    Go and kick your teddy bear round the kitchen (I'd prefer it not to be your cat or your partner), to get the very understandable aggression out of your system, and now start preparing for the next application.
    Best wishes






    ________________________








    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.













    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice@tes.co.uk for one-to-one sessions.


     
  6. Kitten999

    Kitten999 New commenter

    Many thanks Theo and Catbefriender. Of course your right Theo I read too much into what is standard practice. I guess my main gripe is that there wasn't actually a job share vacancy going. It was filled internally by combing two teachers who had both lost their job share partners. Their notices had been handed in some time ago. I suppose I feel a bit foolish that I had such high expectations over what boiled down to nothing. These forums are very cathartic I have to say.
     
  7. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Does this mean that you DID kick that poor Teddy Bear?
    [​IMG]
    Best wishes
    ________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    For the full TES Weekend Workshop programme please visit www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars or contact advice@tes.co.uk for one-to-one sessions.
     
  8. catbefriender

    catbefriender Lead commenter

    Definitely!
     
  9. scienceteacha

    scienceteacha New commenter

    'Go an kick the teddy bear around the kitchen to release some aggression'

    Personally I find that smashing old mugs hard against the patio and finding an area of countryside well away from population and shouting expletives at the top of my voice helps!
     

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