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Dear Theo - how to work out where I'm going wrong?

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by modgepodge, Nov 4, 2011.

  1. modgepodge

    modgepodge Established commenter

    Thanks Lara. to be honest coming on here and reading that so many people are in the same situation makes me feel worse - more competition and it just seems so commonplace that after 3 years people are either giving up on teaching completely, or still doing supply. Also, I think I'm going to be living where I am for 2 years, so when I move back to where we used ot live with the bf I'm going to struggle to get a job because I'll be more expensive :S Need to stop worrying about that though and focus on getting a job first.
    Maybe 2 out of 25 is actually ok - but on here some people are interviewing for 10 jobs before getting one!
    Anyway, thanks for your reply :)
     
  2. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    But over what time scale? It may well be a few years.
    It's going to be difficult if you have to relocate in a year or so, but it's always better to have had recent work, so keep plugging on. Have you considered applying to a wider field i e somewhere half-way between your present location and where you used to be and commuting or is that simply not possible? Then if you have a job you could consider relocating somewhere nearer to your post but equidistant from your bf's workplace?
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Well, you might not be going wrong.
    You might just be in an area and stage/subject where the supply outstrips the demand. The lack of supply work suggests that there isn't a lack of teachers like you out there and available (although supply work in general has dried up, of course).
    You certainly seem to be doing all the right things, including visiting schools (which many applicants cannot afford to do as they lose supply pay), and following the advice here.
    There are just too many unemployed teachers, especially NQTs, and fewer jobs being advertised. Haven't you noticed how thin the TES has got over the last year?
    All I can do is repeat the same advice.
    1) Find out about all the available jobs - do a JobAlert here and look every day at the Local Authority websites round your way
    2) Don't ignore independent schools - do a JobAlert for them too, and do a little research on the local ones so you are ready if something comes up.
    3) Do an executive summary each time. Do it before you write your application, so that the letter really reflects what they need and how you can provide it
    4) Don't feel too depressed - it's not you, it's the state of the economy
    5) Do look out for opportunities to get involved with children in voluntary work. Will keep you sane as well as being something to put on your application.
    Best wishes
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     
  4. Get yourself onto one of the seminars run by the TES. You never know but you might even get to meet Theo himself!!
    It's great for working out where you might be going wrong or just giving you a little hint or tip to improve your applications. Even better you will get to meet a bunch of really lovely people who are in exactly the same boat as you.
    Give it a go, What have you got to lose* (this doesn't look quite right, sorry theo if it's abother bad spelling mistake!!)[​IMG]
    There are biscuits and tea too!!
    S4mm13
     
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    No, that's fine!
    Loose is when something is flapping about, too big for you. Lose is when you can't find it.
    Or think of this sentence: If that puppy gets loose, you're going to lose it!
    Isn't English spelling just horrid?
    You can e-mail Julia at advice@tes.co.uk to get details of these.
    Best wishes to you all
    __________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    www.tes.co.uk/careerseminars
     

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