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Dear Theo, getting back into teaching after 9 years out

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by MrsJo, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. Dear Theo,
    I left teaching 9 years ago to take up an education-related post (creating educational materials and training non-teachers to use them in their roles as visiting speakers to schools). I'd now like to go back into teaching but am unsure about what I would need to do to be employable again. Are there short 'back-to-work' courses available? Would employers look at me having had so much time away?
    I'd appreciate any help or pointing me in the direction of where I can go for help.
    Thanks!
    Jo
     
  2. Dear Theo,
    I left teaching 9 years ago to take up an education-related post (creating educational materials and training non-teachers to use them in their roles as visiting speakers to schools). I'd now like to go back into teaching but am unsure about what I would need to do to be employable again. Are there short 'back-to-work' courses available? Would employers look at me having had so much time away?
    I'd appreciate any help or pointing me in the direction of where I can go for help.
    Thanks!
    Jo
     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Can you give me a tad more information?
    Primary or Secondary?
    What subject specialisation?
    Where in the country?
    If you are a Maths graduate looking for secondary in Central London, they'll bite your hand off, and you can start that afternoon! Others may be different . . .
    ____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The TES Careers Advice service runs seminars and workshops, one-to-one careers and applications advice, one-to-one interview coaching and an application review service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Workshops. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews.
    There is now another seminar on Applying for Senior Leadership on 13th March.
    www.tesweekendworkshop17.eventbrite.com
    E-mail Julia on advice@tsleducation.com for how to book a meeting with me personally.
    Look forward to seeing you!
     
  4. Hi again!
    I'm a primary teacher. Being a primary teacher I don't need to have a specialism particularly but being a piano and guitar player I've generally been music co-ordinator in the schools I've worked in.
    I'm now living in Poole so would be looking at potential jobs in Poole, Bournemouth and Dorset.
     
  5. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Well, it is not going to be easy, is the first point.
    Primary is vastly over-staffed, in the sense that there are very many unemployed Primary teachers.
    And you will have seen that there are not that many jobs in your area - although it would be worse further West, if that is any consolation.
    And, to be honest, of course an employer would be expecting an up-t-date knowledge of the Primary Curriculum and initiatives - it's changed a whole lot more than secondary.
    I am not being very hopeful, I know, but this is the situation, I'm afraid.
    You can see if you can join a RTT course. http://www.tda.gov.uk/teacher/returning-to-teaching.aspx
    They are not that easy to get on, so start investigating asap.
    The other thing is to sign up with a supply agency and cross your fingers really hard.
    Doing supply gets you back into the classroom, gives you experience of what's happening now, and very importantly, gives you a Headteacher reference.
    Now I continue the not-very-hopeful by saying that supply work is not easy to get either.
    This all sounds very depressing, I know, but if you are determined, you might be the very one that proves the exception.
    Best of luck
    ____________________________________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    The TES Careers Advice service runs seminars and workshops, one-to-one careers and applications advice, one-to-one interview coaching and an application review service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Workshops. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews.
    There is now another seminar on Applying for Senior Leadership on 13th March.
    www.tesweekendworkshop17.eventbrite.com
    E-mail Julia on advice@tsleducation.com for how to book a meeting with me personally.
    Look forward to seeing you!
     
  6. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Unfortunately like Theo I haven;t got too much good news. It IS very difficult to find supply work at present, but it is useful at getting you noticed in schools.
    There are many people like myself posting on these forums, who have failed to return to teaching after having our families- having left to look after our little ones.
    But I have been getting periods of long-term sicknes/ maternity covers which has kept me in contact with schools & changes to the curriculum.
    Rural area are definitely more difficult than urban ones & you do have to travel long distances to get work
    Best of luck! There are several posters around Poole & Bournemouth so perhaps one of them could be more helpful.
     
  7. Thanks both of you for the useful information, although not exactly what I wanted to hear! I'll start by going down the supply route and see where that takes me. Do you get supply work through agencies and individual schools nowadays? You used to be able to put your name on a Education Authority supply list but I've looked on the council websites and there's no info.
     

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