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Dear Theo - experienced teacher looking for new role

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by SJHF, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. <font size="2">Dear Theo, </font><font size="2">I am a qualified teacher and my teaching history runs as follows:</font><font size="2">Mathematics - NQT in a state school (1 year) (obtaining QTS) </font><font size="2">Physics and Mathematics - 5 years in a small independent school (I was made Head of Physics as the department was successful and we recruited another member of staff. I also taught mathematics). </font><font size="2">I am now a lecturer in Electrical and Electronic engineering in an FE College. This is the subject of my degree (MEng) and is closely linked to the above two topics. I am also an A Level Physics examiner. </font><font size="2">Owing to personal circumstances, I am now looking to relocate to the South West of England to teach. I seem to find that the jobs I am applying for are in a wide variety of schools/colleges and topics but that I am coming across some problems either before interview or after interview: </font><font size="2"> 1. There seems to be a real desire to only recruit NQT's for the roles</font> <font size="2">2. My 'extra-curricular' activities do not include sport (although I have been really involved in school productions, both on the technical and performing side!) so I am not interesting to the independent schools. </font>
    <font size="2">3. Schools seem to think that I don't have expertise in any area. </font>
    <font size="2">I am beginning to wonder if my CV is too random with its shifts in topic, but the topics I have taught are all related! What am I doing wrong? Is it just tough economic times or can I do something to make me attractive to schools? </font>
    <font size="2"></font>
    <font size="2">Thank you! </font>

     
  2. <font size="2">Dear Theo, </font><font size="2">I am a qualified teacher and my teaching history runs as follows:</font><font size="2">Mathematics - NQT in a state school (1 year) (obtaining QTS) </font><font size="2">Physics and Mathematics - 5 years in a small independent school (I was made Head of Physics as the department was successful and we recruited another member of staff. I also taught mathematics). </font><font size="2">I am now a lecturer in Electrical and Electronic engineering in an FE College. This is the subject of my degree (MEng) and is closely linked to the above two topics. I am also an A Level Physics examiner. </font><font size="2">Owing to personal circumstances, I am now looking to relocate to the South West of England to teach. I seem to find that the jobs I am applying for are in a wide variety of schools/colleges and topics but that I am coming across some problems either before interview or after interview: </font><font size="2"> 1. There seems to be a real desire to only recruit NQT's for the roles</font> <font size="2">2. My 'extra-curricular' activities do not include sport (although I have been really involved in school productions, both on the technical and performing side!) so I am not interesting to the independent schools. </font>
    <font size="2">3. Schools seem to think that I don't have expertise in any area. </font>
    <font size="2">I am beginning to wonder if my CV is too random with its shifts in topic, but the topics I have taught are all related! What am I doing wrong? Is it just tough economic times or can I do something to make me attractive to schools? </font>
    <font size="2"></font>
    <font size="2">Thank you! </font>

     
  3. TheoGriff

    TheoGriff Star commenter

    Well, you are expensive, without a doubt, and schools do have to manage their budgets. But on the other hand, there are loads of NQTs who are really annoyed at being told that they hadn't got the job because they didn't have experience . . . Independent schools can usually (but not always) afford to hire who they want, not just who they can afford.
    So you emphasise that? And talk about Maths Olympics, Physics competitions, Engineering for Girls, Electronics as a club - build your own speakers for your iPod, etc etc. Come on - you can offer loads! Spend an evening looking at the websites of all the best indy schools to see what activities they do that you could copy, and then big it up in your application.
    It's up to you to prove that you have, by quoting examination results in particular.
    I am wondering if you are selling yourself effectively. Are you following the advice that I give? Read this, to save me copying it out again:
    Thinking of going for a new post. Should the app form be submitted in blocks?
    Best wishes
    _______________________________________
    TheoGriff. Member of the TES Careers Advice Service.
    I do Application and Interview one-to-ones, and also contribute to the Job Application Seminars. We look at application letters, executive summaries and interviews, with practical exercises that people really appreciate.
    I shall be doing the Win That Teaching Job seminar on Saturday February 25th, and also the Moving into Headship or SLT seminar on Saturday 18th February
    www.tesweekendworkshop87.eventbrite.com
    www.tesweekendworkshop82.eventbrite.com
     

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