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Dear Theo (and anyone else) - interview lessons...

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by ellie_rose, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. ellie_rose

    ellie_rose New commenter

    I have a few questions about interview lesson expectations. Do they expect you to state your expectations for behaviour etc. to the class when meeting them? Also, is it generally a good idea to use ICT (interactive whiteboard?) I have in all my interview lessons so far but have never got the job - I am wondering if they would like to see a more traditional approach rather than using ICT? Maybe this is where I'm going wrong. Any other general tips on interview lessons would be appreciated!
     
  2. ellie_rose

    ellie_rose New commenter

    I have a few questions about interview lesson expectations. Do they expect you to state your expectations for behaviour etc. to the class when meeting them? Also, is it generally a good idea to use ICT (interactive whiteboard?) I have in all my interview lessons so far but have never got the job - I am wondering if they would like to see a more traditional approach rather than using ICT? Maybe this is where I'm going wrong. Any other general tips on interview lessons would be appreciated!
     
  3. lighthouse_keeper

    lighthouse_keeper New commenter

    I always use some ICT in my lessons, interview or otherwise, and in my personal statement, I always make a big deal of it. So I don't feel I can turn up and not use any ICT. I think it depends on your view of it, plus the subject, age range and also, how big a fan the school is of ICT. Some schools will put that on their person spec, and therefore I think you should meet that criteria in your interview lesson. Some others may not see it as so important, so I think you should judge it by the school's view of ICT. I think to use no ICT whatsoever might possibly be a little extreme - but then I am probably just coming at it from my personal perspective, as I like to use it a lot! It's probably possible to do a fantastic lesson without it! [​IMG]
    The problem with using the IWB or other system resources as integral parts of your interview lesson, is if it goes wrong. In my last interview lesson I wanted to play a video/audio clip. I managed to access the clip online but couldn't get the sound to work. Luckily I had a written version of what the clip was about, so I read that out whilst they watched the video. I had anticipated something might have gone wrong! Equally, if I had an IWB activity, I would have a back up plan just incase their board was not working. And I would write all these things on my plan, how I would deal with the situation if I cannot use what I have planned to. It might be a good idea to show you can anticipate possible issues and come up with an alternative.
    If you can demonstrate that you are experienced in using ICT to <u>enhance</u> learning, and aren't just using it because you can, or because it's there, then surely you can't go wrong. Making sure you can do something as an alternative if the technology fails you will just show how prepared you are.
    Other issues you mention - I asked about SEN and put that on my lesson plan, and then I made sure in the lesson that those pupils had support - the school very kindly gave the pupils name badges, if they hadn't supplied those, I would have given them a piece of paper to put their names in front of them on a sign - it makes life much easier when you know their names. I don't generally talk about behaviour expectations - every interview I have been to, the class has been prepped for the lesson and they have behaved (bar a little talking, but I always like that anyway, so I have a chance to demonstrate how I deal with low-level disruption). I would just introduce yourself and get straight on, and then deal with any behaviour issues as you normally would.
    Make your lesson plan detailed - i always put what I would do if I had more time e.g. I had a half an hour interview lesson but I wrote how I would have extended activities if I had a full hour - I wanted to show I had thought about how to progress the lesson, where to go next etc... Having said that, it shouldn't be pages and pages long! Also give the people watching a copy of the plan, and a copy of each of the resources (I print my ppt slides on a sheet and provide a copy of those).
    Make sure you differentiate: be seen to extend pupils who seem like they find the work easy, and that you have support for those who are struggling.
    Walk round the room and check on the pupils - don't hide behind the desk!
    Know which activities you can miss out if you are running behind (and I always, always run late!) - I think it's better to miss something out and still achieve the objective of the lesson, rather than determinedly trying to do every activity and then missing out the plenary task and the chance to check understanding. You will probably over-plan, but if you know what you can ditch in advance, you won't get flustered.
    Smile! Make sure you appear relaxed and comfortable with the situation. Smiling (though not grinning inanely) will help!
    Bring a watch and wind it! In my last interview my watch had stopped and the classroom clock was wrong. I ended up borrowing a watch from someone in the department! (They didn't seem to mind, as I got the job!)
    Hope this helps, it's only my opinion and you may totally disagree with some/all of it! Good luck in your interview lesson! [​IMG]
     
  4. Kartoshka

    Kartoshka Established commenter

    I think it's fair to assume that the children know how to behave appropriately and will likely have been reminded about behaviour before they come in to the classroom, so I'd just introduce myself and the lesson topic and get on with it.


    One piece of advice I got from here is that if they specifically tell you an IWB is available, you should use it at some point during the lesson, but if they don't mention it, it's up to you.
     
  5. I generally don't for various reasons. I am primary specialist. I am on supply and since leaving teaching 4 years ago I no longer have IWB software on my own computer. Schools all use different hardware as well. I know there are things like PowerPoint but for a 15 minute lesson it's easier to just get on with an activity. I was asked to teach an hour ict lesson so dud this desperately worrying what software the children were used to using etc. I also did a 20 min maths lesson where I accessed an online resource but it was a terrible lesson. At my last interview some if the lessons were being done in a room without IWB although they could accommodate if necessary.

    Maybe this us why I haven't got a job yet. I used the pimp your lesson book last time for my 15 minute 'activity on a general global issue ' and was told it was outstanding along with the planning. No feedback ever mentioned lack of ict.

    I always look for a creative approach to lessons for interviews such as music, singing, props etc.

    I never mention behavior and find it's never an issue due to those observing!
     
  6. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Depends on the school. Some might prefer a more traditional approach I suppose but those must be few and far between these days.
    I personally wouldn't waste too much time with behaviour expectations at the start of an interview lesson, just a short introduction who you are and what you are doing in the lesson. Expectations of behaviour should then come through with the way you present yourself.
    Another poster has given some good tips, so liitle more to say.
    Best of luck for your next one.
     
  7. anon8315

    anon8315 Established commenter

    My advice sounds obvious, but if you feel use of the whiteboard will help aid and enhance learning, use it - if not, don't. [​IMG]
     
  8. Hi,
    I've just realised that due to being on supply, I no longer have the SmartBoard stuff on my laptop!!! D'ohhhhhhhhh
    But I will need music for part of my lesson. Would I look silly if I brought a laptop and just used it to play a song on? Gahhhhhh xx
     
  9. anon8315

    anon8315 Established commenter

    Nope - why would being prepared and organised look silly? x
     
  10. Or take an iPod and portable speaker if you have one.

    After several hours online the other day I found free IWB software as I needed to read a file I was assessing for some freelance work as I had been sent a flipchart file!!
     
  11. I don't have an ipod or owt cos I need to get a job so I can buyyy such things! [​IMG]
    I think I will just take the laptop to play my song off (thanks, Badger). And if I can hook it up to the IWB, fine. If not, hey-ho.
    Cheers, you two xx
     
  12. ellie_rose

    ellie_rose New commenter

    Thank you all for your brilliant advice, it's very helpful. Will keep all of this in mind for my next interview!
     

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