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Dear Sage, Why do some schools require a lesson observation during their recruitment process?

Discussion in 'NQTs and new teachers' started by anon1008, Jun 1, 2012.

  1. Why do some schools include a lesson observation as part of their recruitment process?

    Are lesson observations really necessary in order to employ the best teacher? Especially as candidates have to prove themselves to an interviewing panel through their written Application Form, Supporting Letter and then by actually being interviewed by the interviewing panel.


    Please can I have your thoughts on this?


    I have put this on an open post but would like your view on this.


    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Why do some schools include a lesson observation as part of their recruitment process?

    Are lesson observations really necessary in order to employ the best teacher? Especially as candidates have to prove themselves to an interviewing panel through their written Application Form, Supporting Letter and then by actually being interviewed by the interviewing panel.


    Please can I have your thoughts on this?


    I have put this on an open post but would like your view on this.


    Thank you in advance.
     
  3. Many years ago, when I started teaching interview lessons were rare. Over the years Headteachers seemed to pick up that a demo lesson by candidates was 'good' for helping with the selection process. Personally I feel that they are of limited value. You cannot assess how well a person will teach on a daya to day basis using a one off snapshot. There are far too many variables.
    The pupils are all strangers - unless you are an 'internal'
    The curriculum, resources etc are all new and may be unfamiliar
    If the same class is used for different candidates teaching the same thing then that is not good either
    I could go on with many other reasons why they are not a good discriminator.
    I can see positives
    You get to see how that person is in a teaching rather than interview situation
    You see aspects of the candidates empathy, natural (allbeit nervous) way of dealing with children
    You get to see the candidates general approach to planning.
    There is a new phenomenon coming into play in some interviews - head teachers visiting the candidate's home school to observe them teach in their natural environment where you get to see their teaching with pupils who are fanmiliar and in a setting that is familiar. I know of head teachers who also do this with trainees, visiting them in their placement school to see them teach.
    How to select the 'best' candidate for the job? Well that's the $64K dollar question (yes I know an Americanism - well if you can't beat them join them!!).
    Sometimes the 'best' candidate is not the strongest teacher but the person who fits best into the team and brings something that perhaps the strongest candidate does not have - a skill, a talent, (a coaching qualification in Cricket for the private school needing to boost their position in the cricket league table).
    As a head of science I never placed too much emphasis on the demo lesson and I still don't. There are many other factors that I feel need to be considered in order to secure the 'best' person.
    The Sage
     
  4. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    You don't though, do you? You get to see how they plan an observed lesson (in an alien environment as you describe.).

    Rather makes you wonder if the reason is so they can be confident the person will please Ofsted when they come round...
     

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