1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Dear James: PGCE: Postgrad or prof?

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by mobile2, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. Dear James,
    I am doing a primary PGCE at the moment and I was just wondering about all the postgrad and professional routes of the PGCE. I would like to know that if someone receives a Professional certificate in education instead of a postgrad one, will that have some sort of a negative effect on them when they apply for jobs? If so, how much of a negative effect will it have?

    Thanks for your help James.

     
  2. Dear James,
    I am doing a primary PGCE at the moment and I was just wondering about all the postgrad and professional routes of the PGCE. I would like to know that if someone receives a Professional certificate in education instead of a postgrad one, will that have some sort of a negative effect on them when they apply for jobs? If so, how much of a negative effect will it have?

    Thanks for your help James.

     
  3. First of all you need to distinguish between the academic component of your course and the professional component. QTS is the professional component and is awarded by the GTCE. It is this which allows you to teach in the state maintained sector and it is QTS that schools and Heads will look for when making an appointment. Without QTS you are not a qualified teacher. The PGCE either professional or postgraduate is the academic component. This is awarded by your university and it signifies your ability to work at a particular academic level, either H level ( professional) or M level ( postgraduate). When it comes to the job Market schools will be far less interested in how academic you are and much more interested in how well you can teach. Having said that I don't doubt that schools will look at someone with a masters degree or even a PhD and take that into consideration when making choices or appointments, but first and foremost it is your teaching ability that counts. The last, and present, government is seeking to make teaching a masters profession and in time this will happen I'm sure, but making it compulsory is probably a long way off yet. In some countries it already is compulsory (e.g. Finland - which Mr Gove seems to like) but in all honesty I doubt if schools are at the stage of rejecting good teachers because they have a professional graduate certificate instead of a postgraduate certificate. If you can achieve the latter then do so, but don't let it detract from the core business which is being a good classroom teacher. James
     

Share This Page