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Dear James: NQT four term rule for supply

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by everyavenue, Jul 19, 2011.

  1. everyavenue

    everyavenue New commenter

    Dear James,
    I've just finished my third term of supply teaching (primary NQT- based in Surrey) and I'm just wondering what happens about the four term rule now?
    Do I need to apply to Surrey CC for an extension by the end of the Autumn term 2011?
    There seems to be much debate about this- agencies don't seem to be bothered at all, it's never been mentioned once in a school and I can't get a response from previous uni at the moment. Any ideas?
    Thanks in advance!


     
  2. everyavenue

    everyavenue New commenter

    Dear James,
    I've just finished my third term of supply teaching (primary NQT- based in Surrey) and I'm just wondering what happens about the four term rule now?
    Do I need to apply to Surrey CC for an extension by the end of the Autumn term 2011?
    There seems to be much debate about this- agencies don't seem to be bothered at all, it's never been mentioned once in a school and I can't get a response from previous uni at the moment. Any ideas?
    Thanks in advance!


     
  3. Very simply you are limited to 16 months of supply work (roughly four terms). The time starts on the day you do your first day of supply work and runs out 16 calendar months later, so calculate your time from that first day of supply. Once you reach the 16 month limit then you must apply to the Local Authority (or authorities in which you intend to seek daily supply work) and ask for an extension - the LA can grant up to a maximum of 12 months further supply work.
    Do remember though that any long term work that lasts for a term or more (even if you have gained this work on supply or through a supply agency, or if you are doing the job part time) will be eligible for induction and the school that employs you on this basis must register you for supply and provide all the timetable reductions, mentor and support as set out in the statutory guidance. This form of long term supply, if it was on a part time basis, would allow you to get daily supply for parts of the week where you are not employed, even if you have passed your 16 month limit.
    James
     
  4. everyavenue

    everyavenue New commenter

    Thanks James,
    In which case I have a question and am now dreading what the answer is going to be!........
    I have worked in some regular schools since Nov 2010, one of which still call upon me- this particular school asked me to continue to cover various classes, including a regular 3 days every other week for a period of time, plus all sorts of other cover across KS2. Should I have asked/been entitled for a start on the induction at this particular school?...................
     
  5. Depending on the job you were doing, no, you may not like the answer.
    If you were working 3 days per fortnight teaching a regular timetable and doing the range of duties that a teacher would do and that work lasted for at least a term then the head should have placed you on induction, ultimately the LA would look at the post and decide if the post was suitable for induction, so it is possible that you have lost some induction time.If you were also doing some other work within the same school that may also have been counted towards induction (again at the discretion of the LA).Sadly, induction cannot be backdated so that time is lost. What you must do is ensure that any future post is considered for induction. The main thing to remember is that it is the LA, NOT the head who decides if a post qualifies for induction, so even if a Head says they cannot/won't be able to place you on induction do always check with the LA as they have the final say not the Head.
    James
     
  6. welshwizard

    welshwizard Established commenter Forum guide

    Any agency or individual who breaches the regulations puts themselves in a difficult situation with insurance. Under employers liability terms you are illegally employed and therefore if there is any claim then the insurance company does not pay up! The agencies and schools should be fully aware of regulations and often choose to ignore them however when an insurance does not cough up the claim goes automatically to the individual and school who are at fault.This makes it a high risk strategy for all concerned.
     

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