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Dear Graham - Teaching Dyslexic Children / Adults

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by janegold, Feb 19, 2011.

  1. I'm 44, originally trained as a trilingual secretary (German/French/English) and have spent most of my career in Marketing. I have an OU BA Hons degree in Language Studies (graduated 2005) and particularly enjoyed the "English Language and Literacy" module I studied. I am considering re-training as a teacher and would be particularly interested in teaching dyslexic children or adults. Please could you advise me of the best way to go about re-training for such a career? Many thanks for your help. Jane.
     
  2. I'm 44, originally trained as a trilingual secretary (German/French/English) and have spent most of my career in Marketing. I have an OU BA Hons degree in Language Studies (graduated 2005) and particularly enjoyed the "English Language and Literacy" module I studied. I am considering re-training as a teacher and would be particularly interested in teaching dyslexic children or adults. Please could you advise me of the best way to go about re-training for such a career? Many thanks for your help. Jane.
     
  3. If you choose to train as a primary or secondary school teacher, you can then choose to specialise in areas such as working with dyslexic children or taking responsibility for special educational needs provision.
    To train as a teacher in England or Wales, you need to achieve qualified teacher status (QTS) by completing a course of initial teacher training.
    Teaching is a graduate profession and to apply for ITT courses you must hold a bachelor's degree or an equivalent qualification that is relevant to the subject you wish to teach. For secondary teaching you also need GCSEs at grade C or above or equivalent qualifications in mathematics and English. For primary teaching, a GCSE at grade C or above or an equivalent qualification in a science subject is also required.
    The main postgraduate route into teaching is the postgraduate certificate in education, which can be studied over one year full-time or two years part-time. This includes 18-24 weeks of school placement to help you gain practical work experience.
    Information about the PGCE and other routes into teaching is available via the TDA website (www.tda.gov.uk).
    If you wish to teach adults I suggest that you contact Lifelong Learning UK (www.lluk.org) as they are the sector body responsible for post-compulsory education.
    I hope this helps and wish you luck.
    Graham Holley
     

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