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Date and lesson objective...

Discussion in 'Primary' started by cel90, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. cel90

    cel90 New commenter

    An ideas to drastically speed up Y3 children
    writing the date and lesson objective in their books?
     
  2. Our year 3s don't write the LO in their books, it is preprinted for them to stick in.
     
  3. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Practice!

    And competition. Which table will all be ready first? And so on.

    By November they will have it sorted...
     
  4. If you have books out and date and LO up when they, for example, come in from break, they can put it in before they come to sit on the carpet (assuming that's how you teach). At least getting it done before you really start the lesson means that when you send them to do their work they can get started straight away!
    I also tend to pre-print the date and LO on any worksheets we use, but obviously that's not much help when they're working in their books.
    Other than that, I feel your pain...
     
  5. cel90

    cel90 New commenter

    <font face="Calibri">Thanks for the suggestions! I&rsquo;m an NQT and I think it&rsquo;s just
    a big shock to see how young the new Y3s actually are after only teaching them
    previously in the summer term &ndash; let alone a big shock/step-up for them too!</font>

     
  6. Another way is to get them to do it after they finish - they will go quicker when they want to get out to break/lunch.
     
  7. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

  8. kittenmittens

    kittenmittens New commenter

    I taught Y3 for 4 years and either printed out a strip with the date and LO on for them to stick in, especially if I didn't want them to spend long on a task, or did the competition ploy. They did speed up a lot over the first few weeks. The less able chn would completely forget what they had to do in the actual task by the time they'd painstakingly copied, letter-by-letter a title they couldn't read so I would let them do it at the end. Printing them doesn't take long if you do a week's worth of literacy/topic/maths at a time, assuming you won't be changing your written outcomes a huge amount as a result of AfL, but I do think they need some practice with it to get faster as they move up the school.
     
  9. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    I would definitely suggest that you make the LO as short and child friendly as possible. No child, apart from any with SEN which mean the achieve a very low level, should be copying titles/LOS they cannot read.
     
  10. Does the L.O. really need to be written into the books? We don't. The children should be clear on what the learning is without spending painful minutes copying it down (sometimes incorrectly anyway!)
     
  11. In some schools it is expected to be.
     
  12. But have you ever questioned who it is for? Does it really benefit the children? Or is it just to look neat and tidy for the boss or the inspectors?
     
  13. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    We write it in our school, but instead of a title generally. So the date and LO look smart at the top of the page before the work.
     
  14. jog_on

    jog_on New commenter

    Totally agree! :)
     
  15. Completely agree with these sentiments - if it's not obvious to the children what they're learning during the course of the lesson, surely it's the content of the lesson that's the problem, not the lack of an L.O. in every child's book?!
     
  16. And to those teachers who work in such schools, I have every sympathy for all the time you (or your children) spend preparing written objectives. It's an instant turn-off for me when I'm looking round a school prior to considering applying for a job.
     
  17. jog_on

    jog_on New commenter

    We structure our LOs as "Can I...?" questions. It's great for the children to self-assess against the LO and us too. I don't see it as a problem as we write it as a title too.
     
  18. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Yes who is it for?
     
  19. TEACHER16

    TEACHER16 New commenter

    I was speaking to my head teacher today about this very thing as I was finding that it was taking them a long time to write it down and i was needing my board to teach. So from now on I am only going to orally share it and only get them to write the LO when it is a new topic. I think its habbit I get them to write it.
     
  20. With our head there is no questioning it. None of us are happy with it but it is completely non negotiable in his words.
     

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