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Cross Curricula Learning/ Topic work

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Hannah-L-J, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. I am currently in my final
    year studying education studies conducting a dissertation into Cross curricula
    learning. Thus I wondered if there are any teachers who would kindly offer
    their opinions or whether they think that cross curricula teaching is successful
    within your school and how you define/ monitor the success of it? I.E is it in
    the standard of work or is it merely in the children’s enjoyment of your
    lessons?

    Any feedback would be very
    much appreciated Many thanks!</u>

     
  2. I am currently in my final
    year studying education studies conducting a dissertation into Cross curricula
    learning. Thus I wondered if there are any teachers who would kindly offer
    their opinions or whether they think that cross curricula teaching is successful
    within your school and how you define/ monitor the success of it? I.E is it in
    the standard of work or is it merely in the children&rsquo;s enjoyment of your
    lessons?

    Any feedback would be very
    much appreciated Many thanks!</u>

     
  3. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

    Firstly, and very importantly for your work, you mean "cross-curricular", with the 'r' on the end.
    I use a cross-curricular approach even in Year 7, because it makes sense to combine learning from several points of view.
    Firstly, it's non-sensical to spend 5 hours a week teaching report-writing through some randomly-selected topic, and a separate hour (if only!) on learning about a particular area of history that fits the curriculum. And it works both ways!
    Secondly, it's a good way of making learning more meaningful. Children find it much easier to engage with learning if they can see a purpose to it - even if the only purpose is that it supports another area of the curriculum!
    Thirdly, children need to learn that the skills of, for example, writing, apply in every subject, not just English lessons, and similarly for other subjects.
    And most importantly- I prefer it that way!
     

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