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Cross country help!!

Discussion in 'Physical education' started by emmarugby, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. Hi,

    Am after some help/advice/ideas. I'm currently teaching a mixed (sex and ability) cross country group, there are some very talented runners in this group who I'm trying to push and progress but at the same time some very unmotivated characters 1 who is especially concerning (very slow walk/jog HR reach 180+) me and will just shut himself off from the lesson. I have tried using a HR monitor with him so he can hit specific targets to engage him in this lesson as well as having a member of staff running at the back of the group to motivate him. I'm still in my GTP year so looking for as many different methods to try with him as possible, I really want to engage him in the lesson so that he can get the most out of it and the group are also able to work at their maximum ability.
    Thanks
    GTP

     
  2. Hi,

    Am after some help/advice/ideas. I'm currently teaching a mixed (sex and ability) cross country group, there are some very talented runners in this group who I'm trying to push and progress but at the same time some very unmotivated characters 1 who is especially concerning (very slow walk/jog HR reach 180+) me and will just shut himself off from the lesson. I have tried using a HR monitor with him so he can hit specific targets to engage him in this lesson as well as having a member of staff running at the back of the group to motivate him. I'm still in my GTP year so looking for as many different methods to try with him as possible, I really want to engage him in the lesson so that he can get the most out of it and the group are also able to work at their maximum ability.
    Thanks
    GTP

     
  3. stopwatch

    stopwatch Established commenter

    I think, the level at which this pupil will work, is a gentle stroll round the course, which lets face it will be beneficial to him/her.
    Even for fit, sporty people, cross country is not particularly their activity of choice.
    If you have this extra member of staff who can supervise them, then give them 1 to 1 (after all this would be what's done in a classroom lesson - correct?)
    I would record HR and time it takes, and, if they improve that's a bonus.
    Perhaps get some/all of the rest of the group to encourage him/her and praise him/her for his/her efforts/improvement.
    This will teach them all some social skills too.
    I wouldn't bust a gut over it or feel bad about it.
     
  4. You could try a handicap race which will challenge both the talented runners and your unmotivated ones.
    If you have a set course or distance (say two laps of your school field) get the whole class to race round in a lesson and record the times that it takes everyone to complete it.
    You then work out the time difference between each runner (this will take a little working out beforehand!). For example, first finisher completes in 10 mins 30 secs, second runner finishes in 11 mins flat, <u>time difference is 30 secs.</u> Do this for the whole class.
    During your next lesson, explain that 90% of running is about mental toughness and perseverance. Explain that the students will complete exactly the same course but there is a new challenge. Tell them that the slowest finisher from last lesson will now start off first, followed by everyone else in turn, with the fastest runner from last lesson going last.
    The aim is for the runner who starts off first to try and hold their lead whilst the challenge for the faster runners is to catch those in front.
    All you have to do is record their finish times again and take off their handicap time - you should find is a number of students will improve their times as they are more motivated to keep a lead, rather than be at the back. The talented runners will usually improve their times as they have someone to chase.
     
  5. stopwatch

    stopwatch Established commenter

    Excellent ideas Wilkos. [​IMG]
     
  6. Wilkos, I was about to suggest the same thing! I've been doing it with my kids the past few lessons and some of my juniors have taken over a minute off their 2km time.

    Hare and hound is another one. Depending on their times you pair them up, one fast and one slower. The hares run off first, carrying 3 or 4 tags/bands etc. The hounds then take off a minute or two after and have to chace their hare. For every lap that they lap their hare, they take a band from them. The aim for the hound is to gain all the bands and for the hares to stay ahead of their hound.

    Works well.
     
  7. stopwatch

    stopwatch Established commenter

    Tassiegirl,
    interesting to hear you do 2k with juniors. Which age/year group?
    Do you do it with class groups/all of them or with an after school athletics club
    If it is whole class/year group do you allow them to /walk/jog/walk etc?
    The maximum I do with KS2 is 600m.
    What would be your recommended maximum distance to do with KS2?
     
  8. Stopwatch,
    I am probably breaking all sorts of rules, I did some research when amending sports day last year and I generally adhere to ESSAA standards and my Y5 &6 kids do a 150m and 600m run for sports day. Apparently, 1000m is the max distance for cross country for children under 11. However, we feel this is a riducularly short distance for healthy, active ten and eleven year olds to run. So I started with a mile course, with hills, last year, with the encouragement of parents and smt. This year I have upped it to 2km and nobody has said a word. The majority of kids are doing 2km in 13 minutes, and all between 9 and 14.30 mins. I have two super slows, but even they managed to walk/jog that distance in 17 mins.

    In fact, out of 44 year 6 kids, I have 7 of them running 2km in sub 10mins. They are also on the netball/hockey/tennis/rounders etc teams.....
     
  9. Another idea you could use is the team relay race. For this you will need to have fairly small teams (ideally 4 in a team) and each team should have one of the fastest runners, one of the slowest runners and two 'middle' runners from the class in it. <u>You can find out who these are by checking your results from your previous races.</u>

    You will then need to explain that students, as a team, must complete 5 laps (for example) of the school field (obviously you may have to adapt this depending on your field size. Just make sure that if you have four in a team, they must complete one lap more than the number of people in their team i.e. 3 in a team = 4 laps, 4 = 5 laps, 5 = 6 laps and so on).

    <u>The rules are however:</u>
    • The team can run in any order they choose to
    • They can run whole or half laps
    • Everyone must run at least one lap
    • But, <u>no one</u> person can run more than 2 laps
    What this means is that the team takes responsibility for tactically picking how far each person runs and in which order. Advise them to take into account the strengths and weakesses, in terms of fitness, of each member of their team.

    The fastest runner may decide to run the first and last laps (obviously to try and get a good head start and a sprint finish at the end). Your slowest runner may run half a lap, get a rest and then only have to run another half lap, so they will usually run much quicker knowing this!

    The team that normally does the best is the one that picks that every member does a half lap with their fastest runner on the first and last legs! Just make sure that at the beginning you give them time to decide their running order, make it well known where the half lap mark is (chuck some football corner flags down) and make sure that the runners know where they should be standing i.e. at the half way mark or the start/finish mark, waiting for the runner to tag them.

    I have found that with any ability this cross country activity works. It also encourages good team work and leadership and you may well find people winning the team race that you may not have before. You can continuously change the teams each week as well. Enjoy!
     

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