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crime scene

Discussion in 'Primary' started by emilystrange, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    i want to set up a crime scene outside tomorrow whilst the kids are in assembly. the idea is that my TA will rush in just as i'm starting my carpet session and we'll go outside to look. it'll all lead to a 'police statement' bit of writing, with a visit from a real policewoman to say what information she needs to know from them. next week they can tackle it from a newspaper report POV.
    i wanted each child to decide for themselves what the crime was based on the props etc.
    the only thing i don't know is what props to put out! don't want to make it too gory or too elaborate as i may have to bring it inside and set it up again. the only thing i can think of is turning one of the picnic tables upside down.
    any ideas, anyone?
     
  2. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    i want to set up a crime scene outside tomorrow whilst the kids are in assembly. the idea is that my TA will rush in just as i'm starting my carpet session and we'll go outside to look. it'll all lead to a 'police statement' bit of writing, with a visit from a real policewoman to say what information she needs to know from them. next week they can tackle it from a newspaper report POV.
    i wanted each child to decide for themselves what the crime was based on the props etc.
    the only thing i don't know is what props to put out! don't want to make it too gory or too elaborate as i may have to bring it inside and set it up again. the only thing i can think of is turning one of the picnic tables upside down.
    any ideas, anyone?
     
  3. jwraft

    jwraft New commenter

    If you want some good writing and good ideas you need some random evidence which the children can interpret by themselves. If you have a costume/props cupboard go in and see what wacky and wonderful things you can find. This will be great for children's inference skills (eg if there's a microphone does it mean a singer has committed the crime? if there's a football boot could a footballer be involved?). What age are you working with?
     
  4. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    random evidence is definitely on the cards! my class are R/1/2.
     

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