1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Could I be granted a years sabbatical to stay at home with my boys/ childmind?

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by jmac8679, Apr 6, 2012.

  1. Hi
    I would appreciate some advice,
    I'm considering giving up work to stay at home with my boys but also childmind at the same time. However I am a little worried about packing in my very secure part time job to set up a new business that may fail. So would I be able to ask for a sabbatical in order to see if it all works out, but if it doesnt, return to teaching.
    =P
     
  2. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    So.... you would like to try setting up a business having been given a year off by your school in the guise of sabbatical, only if things business wise work out you won't be back? Don't be silly. If your children are under 5 you are entitled to apply for unpaid parental leave up to 13 weeks up until the date of their 5th birthday, and a maximum of 4 weeks in any academic year.
     
  3. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I can't see any headteacher granting a sabbatical for you to 'stay at home', to be honest. I've granted one in the past, for a teacher who wanted to travel for a year, but that was principally because he was an excellent teacher in a shortage subject.
    These days, most (if not all) heads would say that your choice is either stay and do your job, or resign.
     
  4. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    It's the 'maybe I'll return, may I won't' bit that makes me belly laugh...
     
  5. frustum

    frustum Star commenter

    In many areas, the shortage of child-minders is such that it is difficult to conceive of the business failing. If you start the registration process and advertise now, you might well be able to fill your places for September before the resignation date in May.
     
  6. foxtail3

    foxtail3 Star commenter

    There'll still be a lot of red tape before you can start up as a childminder. Simply being a teacher does not mean that you can automatically be a chilminder. Your property will have to be assessed for suitability, there will be specific guidelines on how many children, you'll have to do first aid, health and safety etc, have suitable transport and the requisite number of car seats, equipment, toys and activities and be beholden to the local authority and Ofsted.
    My DiL who is a qualified EYFS teacher did it, but it was a time consuming and complicated process.
    In answer to the OP, I can't imagine any circumstances in which the HT of your school would agree to the request which you describe.
     
  7. If your children are under 5 you are entitled to apply for unpaid parental leave up to 13 weeks up until the date of their 5th birthday, and a maximum of 4 weeks in any academic year.
    Is that really true?
    So could I ask for unpaid leave to settle my child into their first term at school?
     
  8. Yes.
    Check out the Directgov website for further details.
     
  9. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    After all these years I am still astounded by the number of educated folk who both don't know their employment rights, or have the ability to google.
    Taking some parental leave here would be ideal.
     

Share This Page