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Could anybody run me through how to do the old 'bus stop' division method please??

Discussion in 'Primary' started by trillions, Nov 5, 2007.

  1. I have a low ability maths group and they are really struggling with division. My partner teacher suggested using the old 'bus stop' method where you put the number to be divided into the bus stop and the divisor outside. I did this method at school but ever since have taught using chunking, which my group don't understand at all!

    Could anybody re-cap me how to do it pls??

    Thanks
     
  2. I have a low ability maths group and they are really struggling with division. My partner teacher suggested using the old 'bus stop' method where you put the number to be divided into the bus stop and the divisor outside. I did this method at school but ever since have taught using chunking, which my group don't understand at all!

    Could anybody re-cap me how to do it pls??

    Thanks
     
  3. Is it long divison (chunking) or short division? What age group?
     
  4. delma

    delma New commenter

    I'm racking my brains aswell trying to remember how to do it!
    The bus stop method is how I learnt long division-I'll have to have a think!
     
  5. it's called chunking now. Basically it is division as repeated addition. So for example your sum might be 4657 divided by 45. Then you say to yourself how many groups of 45 can i take away from 4657 to get as close to 0 as possible. So you might say 45x100 = 4500 and take that off leaving 157. How many groups of 45 can i take from 157 to get as close to o as possible. 45x 3 = 135 157- 135 = 22 So my answer is 103 r 22

    45 4567
    -4500 ( 100 x 45 or 100 groups of 45)
    157
    - 135 ( 3 x 45 or 3 groups of 45)
    22

    Add of the goups = 103 and 22 left over.

    Does that make sense?
     
  6. repeated subtraction i mean.
     
  7. I thought you meant this - but I could be wrong! This is how I was taught long division at school...
    200
    |----- 2400 divided by 12
    12|2400

    Please note - the lines are supposed to be joined to make a bus stop shape! The number inside is divided by the 12 outside. We were taught to divide the first 2 digits by the divisor, then write it on top of the bus stop, then either carry over any left over onto the next digit and divide again, until you reach the end.
    I must say though, posingpoodles repeated subtraction is a bit more logical and could be used with this method :~)
     
  8. I would call the way you do it short division which I would reserve for the very bright kids as it is quite difficult to understand. Its amazing that we were just taught methods in school with no explanation!
     
  9. Damn my teachers! I was taught this as long division and yes you are so right about being taught with no explanation. Particulary in maths I just had to do it a certain way and get the answer. Not the way today, thankfully.
     
  10. delma

    delma New commenter

    yes, Choccie, that's how I was taught.
    bloomin' 'eck it looks complicated now i look back on it!I'm wondering how I ever managed to do it!
     
  11. Thanks for all replies, have remembered now. Posingpoodle, I have already tried chunking TO DEATH with them and they just DO NOT understand at all. They are a very poor group and therefore I have to go for SIMPLE method to remember rather than understanding of number. Sad but true, in order to get them thru wretched SATs!!

    Thanks guys!
     
  12. As I remember, 'short division' had an upside down bus stop and was used for smaller numbers...
     
  13. yes but we were also taught short division with big numbers as a quicker method. I have never done the 'bringing the numbers down with arrows thing though...' all very confusing.
     
  14. cally1980

    cally1980 Established commenter

    We use partitioning for our yr4's, I cannot format on here but basically you draw your bus shelter with a longer vertical line and partition the dividend (eg 655 divided by 5 becomes 600, 50 and 5 in their place value columns with the divisor in its usual place). Then the children ask 'is 6 in the 5 times table? No. What is? 5 - well let's make that 6 (hundred) into 5 (hundred) and replace the 1 (hundred) we have deducted onto our next row. Draw another grid to accomodate this change (now it is 500, 150, 5). Repeat process - is 1 (hundred) in the 5 times table? No, it is too small so go to the neighbour. Is 15 (tens) in the 5 times table? Yes - go to next row. Is 5 in the 5 times table? Yes. Now we can start calculating. How many 5's in 5 (hundred)? 1 (hundred) - write this on top of bus shelter in H column. How many 5's in 15 (tens)? 3. Write this on top of bus shelter in T column. How many 5's in 5 (units)? 1. Write this on top of bus shelter in units column. Answer = 131. When children show firm understanding of this method you can shrink it down without the need to partition.
     
  15. I still do teach this method!
    I find that my brighter children, who have a good understanding of number and place value, prefer to use the less 'traditional' methods of multiplying, addition, subtraction and division. However, I usually have a couple who, when shown these "Don't worry about why they work, they just do!" methods love using them as it gives them a way of solving the problem.
    That said: this form of division requires the children to be able to divide and find remainders fairly confidently so they can 'carry' the remainders over to the next column, so I don't do it until they are happy with this.
     
  16. veritytrue

    veritytrue New commenter

    It's quick, it works & children prefer it. Not nearly as many pitfalls as the alternatives. Get off your high horse!
     
  17. I have seen so many mistakes with this method with children from 9 to 16 who were "taught" it at primary school but still didn't get it. I've seen them multiply the numbers, get their tables wrong, put the remainder as a decimal at the end and get confused when the divisor is 10 or more. Try speaking to some secondary maths teachers about children's understanding of mathematical methods.
    All I am saying is that a mathematical method is great if you totally understand it. How many times do you see errors with the grid method (especially when multiplying by multiples of 10), column subtraction (0 - 5 = 5), and even in column addition (23 + 38 = 711)? A fundamental understanding of what is being done is needed.
     

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