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Coronavirus - China - New Semester

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by Lana55, Jan 29, 2020.

  1. SecondPlace

    SecondPlace Occasional commenter

    Agree with this. If a school doesn't have Chinese students then they will have much more latitude in choosing how, or if, to make up time and when the school year ends.

    Any pressure will come from parents and possibly from the companies picking up the tab for the school fees. I would suggest that it is likely that a few Saturdays will be on the cards for those schools.
     
  2. T0nyGT

    T0nyGT Lead commenter

    It's dumb to believe that a country where people are detained for posting information on the virus and doctors were forced to write statements saying there was no virus that the government would under-report figures?

    Really?
     
    HeroForTheDay, suem75 and kpjf like this.
  3. Teachallover

    Teachallover Occasional commenter

    We don’t even know how long this will continue. I’m hearing sometime in April is a predicted date now as schools won’t reopen their doors with virus cases still present. We’ll see. However, if this was the case to do make up days, it wouldn’t be possible to catch up even by working six weeks of summer and all the Saturdays in the meantime. Remember many staff will be due to end contracts and settle on to new locations. They’re not going to hang around until late July.
     
  4. Jason_Bourne_

    Jason_Bourne_ Occasional commenter


    April is the predicted date for the virus to be eradicated. I think schools in HK were closed for around 7 weeks even though the SARS virus took around two years to be fully eradicated.
     
  5. Teachallover

    Teachallover Occasional commenter

    Take it as a pinch of salt. It is yet to be seen. I’m just repeating what our Government liaison officer was told yesterday; we can’t reopen our doors until there are 0 cases reported in the province. Might give us some idea of a date as we’re completely in the dark at the moment.
     
  6. T0nyGT

    T0nyGT Lead commenter

    There is no predicted date for the virus to be eradicated
     
  7. Luvsskiing

    Luvsskiing Occasional commenter

    "There is no predicted date for the virus to be eradicated"

    I read it was going to be eradicated on March 17th at 3.00pm. Are you saying this isn't true?
     
    ajrowing and T0nyGT like this.
  8. clovispoint

    clovispoint Occasional commenter

    Hong Kong students not back until 16th March at the earliest, so you must be very well informed.
     
  9. Luvsskiing

    Luvsskiing Occasional commenter

    The art of wit has died ..... (killed by the virus?)
     
  10. suem75

    suem75 Occasional commenter

    Has anyone else in Beijing been told school will re-open 2 March? Ours just emailed to that effect, but it is still subject to government approval.

    Doesn't sound very definite, does it?
     
  11. Luvsskiing

    Luvsskiing Occasional commenter

    I think teachers who went to China before the virus outbreak in the first place were very brave and hats off to you (unless you were desperate).

    To actually stay there, especially with a family, and believe anything that the Chinese government says about the virus, whether it's great new data on containment, how everything is under control and not spreading, the building of hospitals in six days etc is pure folly; nothing is open to scrutiny and everything is subject to censorship, so how can you believe anything they say? Is it really worth putting your own families at risk on the words of the Chinese government?

    How many teachers contracted to work in China now, are actually in the country I wonder?
     
    ajrowing, T0nyGT and suem75 like this.
  12. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    This is very stressful time for all working in China and I can fully understand if anybody currently working in or has sign a contract for next year decide to leave or decline offers of future employment. All I can say is that Shanghai is different to many other parts of China and I have many contacts around the country to compare conditions.

    For me and my family here in Shanghai we have decided to stay at the moment, far more fear and panic in the UK at the present moment in time. I know many people who have decided to leave Shanghai and other parts of China, I fully support their decision as well as finding a foster home for the cat.

    Shanghai gets back to work Monday so this will give everybody a good chance to see what the current situation is and if the infection rate increases as a result of going back to work.

    I full expect to be going back to school in April using the HK SARS outbreak as a model and schools closed for 7 weeks.
     
    suem75 and PuertaDelVino like this.
  13. Luvsskiing

    Luvsskiing Occasional commenter

    "this will give everybody a good chance to see what the current situationis and if the infection rate increases as a resultof going back to work."

    ..... according to the Chinese Government?

    Be careful. You don't want a visit from the thought police there and be accused of upsetting social order.
     
    PuertaDelVino likes this.
  14. clovispoint

    clovispoint Occasional commenter

    There is still an air of anxiety in HK. The shops are still out of stock of toilet paper, cleaning products, noodles, rice and other basics. (deliveries are arriving but cleared rapidly as soon as they hit the shelf).

    Everyone is masked up, people are keeping their distance and mostly keeping in unless they really need to get out. Buildings are wiped down regularly, hands are being washed, alcohol gel freely available in malls etc. This is all good! If the same level of precaution is maintained the virus will run its course and be finished.

    It's no fun though, cabin fever is setting in. Out for a hike, weather permitting tomorrow.

    Look after yourselves north of the border.
     
    suem75 likes this.
  15. RoadToRags

    RoadToRags New commenter

    Things are starting to get a little tedious in Shanghai. We have been back for three weeks now, and having been teaching online for two of those weeks, I can categorically agree with @clovispoint that online teaching is not a walk in the park.

    The idea of being in the house and doing online teaching for the coming six weeks or more sounds like an extremely tough, and eventually mind numbing schedule, as it is hard to be looking at your computer for 8 hours a day straight, with only virtual interactions with teachers and students. Eventually, your brain starts to shut off, and in my case, get a bit irritable.

    The idea that despite this scrabbling around and hard work to provide our students with the best learning experience possible, we might need to work extra time to make up for the school days lost would be very hard to take.

    My school has a history of finding ways to ignore the Shanghai government education edicts, but if the government ordered a shortened summer holiday, would the school be able to get around that? One thing I do know for sure is that the school will be weighing up the human resource cost of doing this. Expat teachers are mostly not wedded to the school, as nice as it is, and will happily take their services somewhere else where they are not subjected to such things, and school management will know this all too well.

    I certainly would not like to be a school manager dealing with this right now. All you are going to get is the wrath of teachers, students, parents, governors, and shareholders heaped upon you for handling of a situation that you are not in any way in control of.
     
    Luvsskiing, T0nyGT and suem75 like this.
  16. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    Looks like schools in Beijing will be demanding teachers currently on the beach outside of China return ASAP. Beijing authorities are "asking" residents returning to the city to go into 14 days self quarantine. So teachers will have to return well in advance of schools opening date to complete the quarantine before students arrive.

    Interesting to note that many staff who have resigned already have the last day of their employment/work already written into their contracts, schools will need to "negotiate" any additional days of work after this date.

    The weather in Shanghai is forecast to be snow and rain for the next few days to trap us inside the appartment. Last week the bright sunshine and 15C temperatures have made a walk in the park a welcome break from our current mundane existence.
     
  17. february31st

    february31st Established commenter

    Looks like schools in Beijing will be demanding teachers currently on the beach outside of China return ASAP. Beijing authorities are "asking" residents returning to the city to go into 14 days self quarantine. So teachers will have to return well in advance of schools opening date to complete the quarantine before students arrive.

    Interesting to note that many staff who have resigned already have the last day of their employment/work already written into their contracts, schools will need to "negotiate" any additional days of work after this date.

    The weather in Shanghai is forecast to be snow and rain for the next few days to trap us inside the appartment. Last week the bright sunshine and 15C temperatures have made a walk in the park a welcome break from our current mundane existence.
     
    suem75 likes this.
  18. suem75

    suem75 Occasional commenter

    Yes the quarantine 'request' - more like requirement - is what I've had confirmed. I'm wondering why colleagues who returned any time from 6 - 15 days ago were forced to observe quarantine (by their housing complexes' management), when it's only just been made compulsory?

    For those of us who live alone, it seems like it amounts to solitary confinement. that's going to be tough.
     
  19. Teachallover

    Teachallover Occasional commenter

    Authorities in Beijing do indeed require the 14 day quarantine for those entering Beijing, however, the date for this is still blurry. I know one chain school in the city are demanding staff return by this coming Monday for an anticipated 2 March start. However, they are alone in doing so. None of the other schools have been so speedy to name dates as indeed we haven’t yet been told any confirmation of a return date. In fact, another school have specifically said they won’t be reopening until at the earliest 17 March. It’s not up to individual schools to make the decision, it’s better to remain vague like the government.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020 at 6:16 AM
    suem75 likes this.
  20. TusitalaH

    TusitalaH New commenter

    We haven’t been told anything yet, but I know there will be a great deal of push back from international staff if we’re required to return anytime soon. In fact some (American) teachers are refusing to come back before its declared safe for students, ie before the government says schools can open.

    Other teachers from the UK have said they cannot return before the FCO change their advice, or else their personal insurance policies will be invalidated (and they don’t trust the crappy insurance from the school).

    Personally we don’t feel so strongly as many of our colleagues, but the school is going to have its work cut out to get teachers back soon - all international teachers are in communication and are responding collectively.
     
    suem75 and Teachallover like this.

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