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Coping with possible redundancy

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by sensei123, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. Hello,
    Feeling very stressed today. My partner has been told today that her employer is going to make a fifth of the workforce redundant.They're offering voluntary redundancy first, then will make compulsory redunancies if needed. I can't see a fifth of the workforce agreeing to give up their jobs in the current economic climate.
    I've been doing supply for over a year since qualifying as I've been unsuccessful in gaining a teaching job. So money is already really tight.
    I'm very stressed about how we will cope if she loses her job too. Anyone been through similar and got any tips for getting through it?
     
  2. Hello,
    Feeling very stressed today. My partner has been told today that her employer is going to make a fifth of the workforce redundant.They're offering voluntary redundancy first, then will make compulsory redunancies if needed. I can't see a fifth of the workforce agreeing to give up their jobs in the current economic climate.
    I've been doing supply for over a year since qualifying as I've been unsuccessful in gaining a teaching job. So money is already really tight.
    I'm very stressed about how we will cope if she loses her job too. Anyone been through similar and got any tips for getting through it?
     
  3. She hasn't lost it yet. Four-fifths of the workforce have nothing to worry about. Why presume it will be her?
    My d-i-l is in the same boat - she's definitely losing her job in May - and all she can do is look at new jobs and apply for them. As your partner is not a dead cert to be laid off, she can afford to window-shop jobs that are better or at least as good as the one she's got. If she gets an offer she is still able to accept or reject it.
    If your partner is laid off, could you relocate to somewhere with more job opportunities? You aren't tied to any one place jobwise - it could be a lot worse.
     
  4. Thanks Lily. You've helped put in perspective a bit.
    Don't know whether we could afford to relocate but might have to if it comes to that. It's true we would be free to move to where the work was if we have to go down that path.
    We'll just both have to keep applying for jobs and hope that things work out.
     
  5. That's about it! Good luck though - it could turn out to be a blessing in (heavy) disguise if it does happen.
     
  6. Hi
    I have gone through redundancy a couple of times myself with a child too and on my
    own so I do understand the panic attacks that happen. Just take a deep breath and like the previous post said just think things through. Have your plans A B and C ready. but remember you may need to get to plan z before you get a solution - if you see what I mean. You do have to be flexible and it does sound as though you are. Like the previous post advised you just because they are cutting your partner's job does not mean for sure it will go. Please do not get stressed over it to the extent where you cannot sleep because that will not be good for your physical or mental health. Review you finances thoroughly and make sure you have no outstanding debts - so clear the deck of those. If the worse comes to the worse at least you will not have those hanging over you. At least you have been getting work although not permanent. It is still an income. You have a lot going for you both and just mind your health without that believe me no job in the world will help.
    Good luck.
     
  7. anon468

    anon468 New commenter

    Hi sensei
    Positive story for you. I've been made redundant twice in the last 10 years and in addition my last employer went into voluntary liquidation (October 2009), so the entire workforce was left high and dry with wages, redundancy and notice pay all owing.
    In every case, I've found alternative employment almost immediately. The second redundancy ws actually a Godsend as I got a handsome payoff which practically cleared the mortgage (plus I hated the job, so I was glad to take the money & run!).
    I work in the private sector and was extremely proactive in networking and using all available contacts within my sector. The jobs I secured after the first redundancy and the liquidation came to me rather than the other way round.
    So, there is hope. I won't pretend the stuation wasn't incredibly stressful at the time (it was, very much so), but you can and do cope. You have to. And by God it's made me a stronger and more resilient person. I was also incredibly lucky to have an amazingly supportive partner who boosted my confidence and reassured me every step of the way. We worked out how we would manage if it took a while for me to find something else or if I had to take a much lower paid job. We lived on free potatoes from his work for a month after the liquidation, when I was left with no pay. We joked about how many different potato-based meals I could conjur up!
    In short, be positive, support one another, be proactive and retain your sense of humour.
    Good luck. I wish you well.
     
  8. Thanks for the positive messages. The initial panic has worn off now, and we've got some plan B, C and Ds lined up.
    It's good to hear some people have gone through this and come out the other side.

     
  9. I work for Connexions and in June we were told that we needed to lose 40% of our staff. After the 90 day consultation process 3 people were made redundant, the other employees took the voluntary redundancy offered. So some do choose that. Now about to enter the next big change, Connexions as a company is being dissolved and we will become part of the county council!!
    Watch this space. [​IMG]
     

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