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Controlled Assessment Marking

Discussion in 'Scotland - education news' started by millicent_bystander, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. millicent_bystander

    millicent_bystander New commenter

    Would really appreciate some advice/thoughts from everyone.
    Having
    done some sample moderation of controlled assessment folders before
    Christmas, some slight issues with marking were identified, but these were within a couple of marks
    either way. This process was done with an experienced exam marker. My
    folders were checked, only a small sample, but some marking was deemed
    too harsh and I was advised to add some marks on the Of Mice and Men prose
    piece. Another folder generated the comment 'I really don't know what
    else you'd expect this student to do'. Therefore I deemd my marking to
    be more or less on track.
    We've had an adviser in who has
    identified that my marking (and that of others) is at least one band too
    generous, in some cases two bands. I'm puzzled as to how there can be
    so much discrepancy between judgements - I've now had all of my folders
    down marked and am questioning my own judgement, which is really
    disconcerting.
    Has anyone else had judgements queried and found that the opinions on what each band means are differing wildly?
     
  2. millicent_bystander

    millicent_bystander New commenter

    Would really appreciate some advice/thoughts from everyone.
    Having
    done some sample moderation of controlled assessment folders before
    Christmas, some slight issues with marking were identified, but these were within a couple of marks
    either way. This process was done with an experienced exam marker. My
    folders were checked, only a small sample, but some marking was deemed
    too harsh and I was advised to add some marks on the Of Mice and Men prose
    piece. Another folder generated the comment 'I really don't know what
    else you'd expect this student to do'. Therefore I deemd my marking to
    be more or less on track.
    We've had an adviser in who has
    identified that my marking (and that of others) is at least one band too
    generous, in some cases two bands. I'm puzzled as to how there can be
    so much discrepancy between judgements - I've now had all of my folders
    down marked and am questioning my own judgement, which is really
    disconcerting.
    Has anyone else had judgements queried and found that the opinions on what each band means are differing wildly?
     
  3. Flyonthewall75

    Flyonthewall75 New commenter

    Frequently, wherever the judgement is based on personal opinion.
    For example, I recall a member of an HMIe inspection team claiming that a class teacher had assessed the writing of the primary pupils in her class too highly.
    When politely asked for the evidence of how she had come to that judgement, she said that she had left the details at home and would bring them in the next day.
    Strangely, the evidence of how she had reached her judgement never did appear and the matter was quietly dropped.
    The HMIe 'inspector' in question was, in fact, a lay member of the team and had no teaching qualifications, or teaching experience, whatsoever.
    Similarly, I remember a course in which a group of promoted teachers was asked to view a video of a class teacher teaching a lesson and then grade it on a scale ranging from excellent to unsatisfactory.
    Surprise, surprise, the group graded the same lesson at every level from excellent to unsatisfactory. Some of the reasons given were extremely harsh and nitpicking, and included the teacher's dress sense, hairstyle and tone of voice.
    These were senior staff who would be making important judgements about the teaching ability of some of their colleagues.
    Unfortunately, too much in education today is about power and control rather than the education of pupils.
     

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