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Considering entering the teaching field.

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by Teacherteacher27, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. Hi guys,
    I've been considering this for a while and even wrote a post on here a while ago. But after seeing some conflicting replys from some members, basically saying "Do not enter the profession, all the shortage stories you read were for specific subjects, now we have thousnads of teachers out of work, NQT's as well as experianced teachers can't find work for love nor money". I'm a bit dubious, especially after watching/reading an article on BBC.
    I'm a 28 year old male, in a full time job, and still at home. I was considering entering the primary school teacher field. Now I know I have to re-take some GCSE's as I got a D in Maths and D in Science that I am prepared to do. But seeing the replys of some members has put me off. I see people moaning about the work that involves in being a teacher and the "help they don't get", they list all the negatives as oppossed to ANY positives. I'm not a teacher so I can't really know if there are any positives, but surely it can't be all that bad to be a teacher. I guess obviously the area has an affect on the children you teach, but I'm not like saying that a specfic area has kids that are all the same, that's a bit of a blanket statement.

    Anyway the point I'm trying to make after going of on a tangent is: Considering I'm a male, and would like to go into Primary school teaching, mainly to try and help shape and teach the kids before they get to high school, where the problems don't get addressed, if anything it gets worse. I want to teach kids the values I had and the respect for adults that was taught to me by teachers and faimly and mainly my mum. I enjoy being with my nephews and nieces, all of around 4-9. I'm not put off by the stigma that surrounds male teachers in primary schools, and I consider myself at times to be an authortarin type of figure, tehy seem to listen to me. I would just love to know I had a hand in helping the next generation not turn out like the current one, not all, but a majorly high number of them! Again going off, is it worth me putting the effort in to become a male teacher or would I still be fighting with female teachers to get the job, given the OBVIOUS LACK of male teachers in schools. This is the link and story http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/8734967/No-male-teachers-at-4500-primary-schools-figures-show.html. Getting the experiance to work with kids isn't that hard for me, as I can book holidays of work and do it in that time.
    I'd appreciate any feedback and thoughts, please constructive post's are MOST appreciated.
    Thanks again. Sorry for the wall of text!
     
  2. Hi guys,
    I've been considering this for a while and even wrote a post on here a while ago. But after seeing some conflicting replys from some members, basically saying "Do not enter the profession, all the shortage stories you read were for specific subjects, now we have thousnads of teachers out of work, NQT's as well as experianced teachers can't find work for love nor money". I'm a bit dubious, especially after watching/reading an article on BBC.
    I'm a 28 year old male, in a full time job, and still at home. I was considering entering the primary school teacher field. Now I know I have to re-take some GCSE's as I got a D in Maths and D in Science that I am prepared to do. But seeing the replys of some members has put me off. I see people moaning about the work that involves in being a teacher and the "help they don't get", they list all the negatives as oppossed to ANY positives. I'm not a teacher so I can't really know if there are any positives, but surely it can't be all that bad to be a teacher. I guess obviously the area has an affect on the children you teach, but I'm not like saying that a specfic area has kids that are all the same, that's a bit of a blanket statement.

    Anyway the point I'm trying to make after going of on a tangent is: Considering I'm a male, and would like to go into Primary school teaching, mainly to try and help shape and teach the kids before they get to high school, where the problems don't get addressed, if anything it gets worse. I want to teach kids the values I had and the respect for adults that was taught to me by teachers and faimly and mainly my mum. I enjoy being with my nephews and nieces, all of around 4-9. I'm not put off by the stigma that surrounds male teachers in primary schools, and I consider myself at times to be an authortarin type of figure, tehy seem to listen to me. I would just love to know I had a hand in helping the next generation not turn out like the current one, not all, but a majorly high number of them! Again going off, is it worth me putting the effort in to become a male teacher or would I still be fighting with female teachers to get the job, given the OBVIOUS LACK of male teachers in schools. This is the link and story http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/8734967/No-male-teachers-at-4500-primary-schools-figures-show.html. Getting the experiance to work with kids isn't that hard for me, as I can book holidays of work and do it in that time.
    I'd appreciate any feedback and thoughts, please constructive post's are MOST appreciated.
    Thanks again. Sorry for the wall of text!
     
  3. lisavicky

    lisavicky New commenter

    I'm currently retraining. Your post shows a lack of understanding about what will be required in todays teaching which is maybes why you received negative comments. First, to get your GCSE's is the least of your problems (you will also need a degree if you don't have one). It is unlikely you will be accepted on any course without having had full time work experience with children in a school for at least six months and probably a year. Secondly, having a personal relationship with children has no link whatsoever to what you will be doing in the classroom, they are entirely different skills. Much of today's teaching is very technical in terms of the exact terminology used in the classroom, the processes of learning etc and you need to gain an understanding of this before you consider retraining. Places for training are very, very difficult to get and you need to be very clear what it is about the profession that interests you before you go further. Sorry to be negative but I think you need to do more research first.
     
  4. I would suggest you get the Maths re-sit sorted first and then continue with your research. Get weekly updates of jobs within your area and evaluate if much comes up. Primary is fiercely competitive; male or female! I have been looking for a post in Scotland since November - English teacher in Secondary - not ONE job has come up in the area I've been looking at.
    Don't jump in feet first!
    I LOVE my job and teaching itself - hate all the pointess paperwork etc.
    I became a teacher aged 30 and find the pay to be ok and holidays great.
    Good luck!
     
  5. @Lisavicky
    While I appreciate what you've wrote. It seems you've read a couple of lines and jumped on some soapbox.
    I asked what peoples opinoins were regarding me maybe entering the profession as a male teacher (especially in Primary school), with so many teachers out of work and NQT's struggling to find work
    You have totally mis-understood what I wrote and the point I'm trying to ask. This isn't about what I need "to be a teacher". I believe I have done enough re-search into what I need and how long it will take, I'll be looking at 33 before I qualify. I haven't mentioned anything other than the GCSE's I need. Firstly I haven't even been training to be a teacher let alone "retrain". Secondly I know I need a degree. Thirdly having and being able to have some sort of connection with children and particularly an age group I'm considering will have an impact, but I understand that it won't be like talking to my nieces and nephews.
    Thanks, for your, uneeded advice. Next time, just have some paitence and read and learn what the original question was as oppossed to just writing somethings I never even asked about.
    Sorry to come across rude. But you have totally disregarded the question I asked.

     
  6. @Candle

    Thanks for that, but what I don't understand is how the primary teaching side is SOOO competive when they say themselves that there is such a lack of male teachers, do they not want men to teach or, I'm confused. I know the lack of male teachers in the primary section might have a lot more Male teachers by the time I might qualify, so this is my question, would you consider it? It's something I'm considering, but it'll be a lenghty process but ultimately rewarding I feel!

     
  7. Perhaps you are not considering the possibility that they LIE. The government lies. It is what they do. They do it well and profusely. There is a huge surplus of elementary teachers. That is the truth.
     
  8. lisavicky

    lisavicky New commenter

    Sorry to sound so rude but you seem sadly naive about the role of male or female teaching. Males are welcomed into the profession and usually get the jobs before the females so that just isn't an issue. You are looking at at probably 6 years of hard work ahead of you and as someone who is in their 40's training and most people take more than one year to find a plac, and that's after doing a year voluntary in schools, I am well aware of the difficulties of getting into the profession. If you talk to tutors in the way you did in your post they will eat you alive and you will have no chance of getting in. Seriously, take my advice and look at what you will need to do to get there rather than consider the very much side issue of being a male or female. It is very, very difficult to get in and you have to show a real dedication and commitment and a love of teaching. I'm afraid if it didn't come across to me then it won't come across to any future admissions tutors. Believe me what I've written is small fry in terms of showing them how much you want the job and you need to stop thinking that just because you're a male they'll see you any differently, what they want is commitment. There is a huge shortage of teachers jobs so you have to be good, you have plenty of time to bear that in mind if you decide you want it for the right reasons.
     
  9. Hi It is true that men are under-represented in primary schools, and we are actively trying to encourage more men to apply for initial teacher training (ITT) courses.
    As you say in your post, it is important for children at primary school age to benefit from male role models, in addition to the more common place female role models in schools. You certainly sound like you have given great consideration to this career path, and you come across as having precisely the enthusiasm and motivation we are looking for. All these factors will go towards making your application strong and appealing to the ITT providers.
    When considering applications to ITT courses, and subsequently applications for teaching positions within primary schools, those assessing the applications will look to accept the strongest candidate(s) available. ITT providers and headteachers cannot be seen to discriminate positively or negatively towards an applicant based on their gender, so for this reason you would be competing for training places and teaching positions with both men and women equally.
    As important as having a greater male presence within our primary schools is, the priority as always is to ensure that we are making the most of the best teacher available, irrespective of gender. With this in mind I would suggest continuing to pursue this career, however make sure you prepare the strongest application you can. Gain as much experience as possible, and allow your passion and reasons for teaching this age range to come through clearly both in your application, and in your interview.
    Don't get put off by some of the negative comments about teaching. It can be an incredibly rewarding career, offering up new challenges all the time. I wish you the very best in your endeavours to become a primary teacher.

    Stephen Hillier, TDA
     

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