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Consensus of opinion wanted, please!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by lovely.lady, May 11, 2011.

  1. lovely.lady

    lovely.lady Occasional commenter

    Should primary pupils be summatively assessed at the end of the year on how much they have retained in history?
    I know my thoughts on this and am wondering what other professionals think. In particular it would be very interesting to get responses from KS3 history teachers.

    Thanks

    ps I've also posted on History forum
     
  2. ROSIEGIRL

    ROSIEGIRL Senior commenter

  3. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    Yes. Mainly because I love the subject and love tests.
     
  4. At one school where I worked in the Infants we had to report which National Curriculum level the children were working at for every subject at the end of each term! I'm pretty sure that it made no difference to my teaching or the children's learning.
     
  5. Oops forgot to add that I was obliged to test these little treasures to "help inform my judgements".
    Which year did William the Conqueror become King of England? Some of the 5 year olds could write the correct answer but they had no concept of time or who William the Conker really was etc. They had learnt it by rote. But they did like the thought of someone getting an arrow in the eye...
     
  6. I once saw a teacher testing the class on their topics - 80 questions, children worked through and took a break every now and then. The thought of marking 80 questions x 30 children filled me with dread, the work looked awful and they weren't even writing in full sentences. What was the point? My class enjoy history and their books are a record of what they've learnt.
     
  7. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    Although my comment about having tests was slightly sarcastic I do feel that just because something is in a history book doesn't mean a child remembers it. I have done interviews as History subject leader with children across all year groups (in other schools too) and much of what has been 'learnt' is quickly pushed out of the brain.
     

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