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Concerned about seeing doctor

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by anon3946, Nov 23, 2011.

  1. To cut a long story short (ish), I have a history of depression and associated issues dating back from my early teens. Some issues are beginning to creep in again and I'm loathe to go to the doctor about it. Partly because I've had some poor experiences in seeking help ("well, we WOULD put you on this drug BUT I don't think so...", going to a councellor who made me draw pictures then tried to tell me how I felt (wrongly) but interpreting them (badly- claiming a person had a face when in fact it was the overlap of my stickman circle-head), etc); partly due to not having a doctor; partly because I'm AWFUL at talking about this- I kind of feel like a fraud, because I'm functioning and, besides a drunken moment of stupidness, I have not caved in to any stupid impulses; but mainly because, when I signed up to my PGCE, I had to fill in a medical form and then had calls from the uni to check my mental stability- I don't want people thinking I'm unfit to do a job which is, quite frankly, the good thing in my life and my reason for getting up each morning. I fear there'd be the assumption that it's the stress of a PGCE which is doing me in, when it's the complete opposite!
    Any suggestions, or do I just need to plough on and hope it goes away?
     
  2. If you had a history of a dicky heart, and started getting chest pains would you go see the Doctor?
    If you had a history of bad joints, maybe one in particular, and a twinge happened a few times in the same week,would you go see the Doctor?
    I would wager anyone's answer to those would be yes. So why are mental health issues ANY different.
    By contacting health services now it may very well assist in it going no further - if you do nothing, it may well go away, it may well rear its head a few weeks, months or however long down the path, or it may blow up into a larger issue right now.
    If you do not get on with your doctor, see another one.
    Mine has been WONDERFUL even if, bless her, she doesn't really know a lot about MH, and I feel supported massively.
    Not really sure why you feel you would be putting anything at jeapody by seeking assistance now, rather than letting it get to a point where you very well could be kicked off your PGCE if it did get to the stage where you were signed off for a long period of time due to ill health. Seriously - go see a doctor, and if you feel they are not helpful, go see another.

     
  3. My main concern is that, despite doctor/patient confidentiality, it all goes onto my records and whenever I get a medical form to fill in, I HAVE to declare it. And because of attitudes towards mental health, I fear it could put across the wrong idea about me. If I could do it anonymously, I'd be far more at ease.
     
  4. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    If you can afford it go private. If you are on limited income contact MIND. I really wouldn't worry though as only occupational health will know when you go for a job.
     
  5. Thanks- I can barely afford anything right now, let alone private medical stuff, but I'll look into MIND. It's a catch-22 really- part of the reason I'm getting low (bad term, as a lot isn't so much about low as highly strung, anxious and panicky) is because I feel isolated, but it creates a sense of isolation in itself.
     
  6. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    MIND have a befriending service that could help you feel less isolated. Also get checked out medically because problems with your thyroid can give you those same symptoms for example. You are also up late so think about your sleep habits.
     
  7. lilykitty

    lilykitty New commenter

    HappyPixie is also a very wise pixie!
    I have also experienced depression and anxiety related stuff since my teens, which comes and goes. It's my responsibility to deal with it, just as it would be if I had diabetes or any other health issue. The only time it becomes a real problem is when I stick my head in the sand and keep saying 'I don't need help, I'll just keep going'.
    I have always been open about this on the medical forms and the most 'follow up' I've had from it was when Occ Health called to say 'are you OK now? If you think we can help in the future get in touch'. Any school you apply for does not get access to your medical records - they are just told whether Occ health have judged you fit for work, whether they are recommending adjustments to support you (e.g. if you are hearing impaired) or if you are not fit for work.
    If you are someone who is open and honest about your health (and show that you are responsible when it comes to managing the difficulties it presents) you won't have a problem. If you try to be someone you're not (i.e. someone who is absolutely fine but dying on the inside) it will have a negative affect on your whole life, including your job.
    Teachers tend to be people who set high standards for themselves and don't like to ask for help. Consequently, you won't be the first who has a tendency towards depression!
     
  8. What is written on your medical records is your business. There are two points about this.
    Firstly, no-one is allowed to see your medical records unless they are treating you, or you give your consent for them to see them. So, Mr Smith, your new Head Teacher is not going to know what is on your medical records.
    Secondly, when applying for a job, the potential employer is not allowed, by law, to ask you any health related questions prior to offering you the position. They can then ask you health related questions, but only in the context of what reasonable adjustments they need to make to ensure you can do job.
    So, get yourself to a Doctor/Therapist and see what you can do to get well.
    Good luck.
     

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