1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice
  3. The Teacher Q&A will be closing soon.

    If you have any information that you would like to keep or refer to in the future please can you copy and paste the information to a format suitable for you to save or take screen shots of the questions and responses you are interested in.

    Don’t forget you can still use the rest of the forums on theTes Community to post questions and get the advice, help and support you require from your peers for all your teaching needs.

    Dismiss Notice

Concerned about a neighbour

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Kartoshka, Apr 24, 2011.

  1. Kartoshka

    Kartoshka Established commenter

    From what you've written, my impression is that it's just her being overdramatic. Pre-teenage angst and hormones setting in, perhaps. I think if she really was afraid of someone hurting her she wouldn't be shouting "I hate you" or anything that would inflame the situation. Interested to hear what others think about this, though.
     
  2. That's horrid!
    Either she's a right little madame playing on the neighbours or she is in big trouble!
    Chances are it's a bit of both, but as a neigbour what do you do?
    You could call social services and hope that a single visit shows her how silly she is being and how serious the consequences. If she is a right little madam I'm sure her parents won't hold a grudge.
    If they do then they need the visit!
    But I don't know what I'd do if I was in your shoes!
     
  3. I would hold a grudge if my neighbours called social services on me. Why not try getting to know them?
    She sounds as if she is unhappy but not abused.
     
  4. Why?
    It would show someone cared - unless you had a guilty secret!
    A visit would certainly stop her from being a madam or it might be the alert needed to save her from being hurt.
    We had a visit when my sister was about 5. She had had a summer of weird accidents. She had flipped off a skateboard and landed on one side, blacking half her face. Then she slipped down the stairs, landing on her face, getting black eyes again. Then she slammed into the shed door, I was opening it at the time and she sort of burst her nose. Sheonly went to A&E for the first as she may have had concussion.
    Social services arrived at the door one teatime. Mum and dad were obviously mortified but my sister happily walked them round the house and up the road to the scenes of the crimes. They went away, suggesting only that our GP checked her out for somthing more than clumsiness!
    We never did find out who called them, obvioulsy a concerned neighbour, but it didn't cause any hurt feelings between us and anyone else!
    Social services really aren't the bad guys or child snatchers!

     
  5. Reminds me of the time my two year old took to screaming "Help I'm being kidnapped" every time we put him in the car. As I was (VERY) pregnant at the time, the caused no end of amusement/hassle/annoyance. But noone ever did call the SS (sorry, Social Services)
     
  6. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    My MIL get a call after the neighbours called, worried about the noise my hubby was making - over having a bath!
     
  7. I think she is just trying to get attention.
     
  8. Sounds to me like she was spoilt rotten for years until the younger sibling came along and hasn't got used to sharing attention.
     
  9. I'd be quite concerned about that in an 11 year old. If the girl was 14, maybe some of the above comments would be valid, but I would definately want someone to check on an 11 year old in that situation.
     

Share This Page